Anna Rose
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Anna Rose

New York City, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2003 | INDIE

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2003
Solo Alternative Singer/Songwriter

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"All In The Showbiz Family: Musical Offspring"

Anna Rose, the daughter of award-winning composer Alan Menken, isn’t headed in the same musical direction as her father (who's one trophy away from an E.G.O.T.). Her bluesy sound and style, heard best on her 2013 album, Behold a Pale Horse, brings to mind classic rock and roots. Menken, meanwhile, is known for such Disney classics as Aladdin, Pocahontas, Hercules, the Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, and more. - The Hollywood Reporter


"All In The Showbiz Family: Musical Offspring"

Anna Rose, the daughter of award-winning composer Alan Menken, isn’t headed in the same musical direction as her father (who's one trophy away from an E.G.O.T.). Her bluesy sound and style, heard best on her 2013 album, Behold a Pale Horse, brings to mind classic rock and roots. Menken, meanwhile, is known for such Disney classics as Aladdin, Pocahontas, Hercules, the Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, and more. - The Hollywood Reporter


"Exclusive Track Premiere of "Los Angeles""

Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the exclusive premiere of "Los Angeles," a new song by New York-based rocker Anna Rose.

Rose, who has been playing guitar since she was 5, studied under guitarist Arlen Roth for several years (She still considers Roth her guitar "godfather"). Rose owns 11 guitars but usually can be spotted with her Fender Telecaster or Gretsch Black Falcon.

Rose and her band — Adam Stoler (guitar), Tyler McDiarmid (guitar), Jordan Perlson (drums) and Jamie Bishop (bass) — have announced their residency at New York City's Rockwood Music Hall May 7 through May 21. Check out the flyer below for more details.

Rose's second album, Behold a Pale Horse, will be released later this year.

For more about Rose, check out her official website and Facebook page. - Guitar World


"Exclusive Track Premiere of "Los Angeles""

Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the exclusive premiere of "Los Angeles," a new song by New York-based rocker Anna Rose.

Rose, who has been playing guitar since she was 5, studied under guitarist Arlen Roth for several years (She still considers Roth her guitar "godfather"). Rose owns 11 guitars but usually can be spotted with her Fender Telecaster or Gretsch Black Falcon.

Rose and her band — Adam Stoler (guitar), Tyler McDiarmid (guitar), Jordan Perlson (drums) and Jamie Bishop (bass) — have announced their residency at New York City's Rockwood Music Hall May 7 through May 21. Check out the flyer below for more details.

Rose's second album, Behold a Pale Horse, will be released later this year.

For more about Rose, check out her official website and Facebook page. - Guitar World


"Introducing ANNA ROSE - Interview"

“Songs that form your debut album are kind of the greatest hits of your childhood in a way. And they’re not, for some people, what you end up becoming as an artist…” Anna Rose.

Anna Rose is something of a rare breed. A singer-songwriter with an ear to 90s pop-rock and a penchant for big hooks, her sound is straightforward, even earnest, with a focus on performance over production. The daughter of Disney composer Alan Menken (of Aladdin and The Little Mermaid fame), she has a big, unapologetic style that you don’t hear a lot of these days.

The morning after the release show for her album, Behold a Pale Horse, we caught up with the NYC-based Rose to chat about her new music.

“I won’t lie to you, the writing process was really hard,” says Rose. “I had a record before this one, and I think when you put out your first record as a solo singer-songwriter, you kind of write those songs as you grow up and as you find your place in the world. Those songs that form your debut album are kind of the greatest hits of your childhood in a way. And they’re not, for some people, what you end up becoming as an artist. So this record, I think really shows where I am now and where I want to continue going.”

Where she is, or perhaps what she has created is a folky, bluesy album that sounds like Tori Amos infused with Blues riffs and Rock and Roll instrumentation. Her guitar-heavy attack and decidedly unaffected production stand out against a sea of synth-pop duos and crushing EDM, and while it may sound a bit out of place in 2013, Horse… is an enjoyable if decidedly inoffensive effort from a musician who is steadily finding her own voice.

“‘Behold a pale horse’, the phrase comes from the Book of Revelations. I’m not a particularly religious person but this goes back to the theme of, if you left this world tomorrow, what would you leave behind? If you could leave this album as a legacy, what would it be?”

Anna Rose 2Themes of legacy, forward motion and letting go of the past pop up in various capacities throughout her new album, most notably amongst the galloping rhythms of ‘Los Angeles’, where she dismisses the city that she lived in for five years as if it was a scorned lover. However, her musical output diverse from song to song. Rose dabbles across the folk, rock, and pop spectrums, in many ways using the songs as a vehicle to highlight her work as a live performer.

“I’d rather have it sound live than anything else. I’d rather have the listener hear the squeak of a finger moving along a string or my breath on the microphone…I really love performing live. It’s a really big part of who I am. That’s what I want to be doing right now. Jut performing these songs.”

That’s not to say that she isn’t a serious songwriter and producer as well, as evidenced on standout songs like, ‘Beautiful World’ and ‘Electric Child’ where she displays her knack for hooky Americana and blistering Dead Weather-inspired riffage, respectively.

So what’s next for Anna Rose? “There’s a lot of stuff that didn’t make it on to this album that will be on another album pretty soon, so that’s exciting to know that there’s more material out there ready to go and that I’m really ready to write.”

Behold A Pale Horse is out now. - When The Gramophone Rings


"Introducing ANNA ROSE - Interview"

“Songs that form your debut album are kind of the greatest hits of your childhood in a way. And they’re not, for some people, what you end up becoming as an artist…” Anna Rose.

Anna Rose is something of a rare breed. A singer-songwriter with an ear to 90s pop-rock and a penchant for big hooks, her sound is straightforward, even earnest, with a focus on performance over production. The daughter of Disney composer Alan Menken (of Aladdin and The Little Mermaid fame), she has a big, unapologetic style that you don’t hear a lot of these days.

The morning after the release show for her album, Behold a Pale Horse, we caught up with the NYC-based Rose to chat about her new music.

“I won’t lie to you, the writing process was really hard,” says Rose. “I had a record before this one, and I think when you put out your first record as a solo singer-songwriter, you kind of write those songs as you grow up and as you find your place in the world. Those songs that form your debut album are kind of the greatest hits of your childhood in a way. And they’re not, for some people, what you end up becoming as an artist. So this record, I think really shows where I am now and where I want to continue going.”

Where she is, or perhaps what she has created is a folky, bluesy album that sounds like Tori Amos infused with Blues riffs and Rock and Roll instrumentation. Her guitar-heavy attack and decidedly unaffected production stand out against a sea of synth-pop duos and crushing EDM, and while it may sound a bit out of place in 2013, Horse… is an enjoyable if decidedly inoffensive effort from a musician who is steadily finding her own voice.

“‘Behold a pale horse’, the phrase comes from the Book of Revelations. I’m not a particularly religious person but this goes back to the theme of, if you left this world tomorrow, what would you leave behind? If you could leave this album as a legacy, what would it be?”

Anna Rose 2Themes of legacy, forward motion and letting go of the past pop up in various capacities throughout her new album, most notably amongst the galloping rhythms of ‘Los Angeles’, where she dismisses the city that she lived in for five years as if it was a scorned lover. However, her musical output diverse from song to song. Rose dabbles across the folk, rock, and pop spectrums, in many ways using the songs as a vehicle to highlight her work as a live performer.

“I’d rather have it sound live than anything else. I’d rather have the listener hear the squeak of a finger moving along a string or my breath on the microphone…I really love performing live. It’s a really big part of who I am. That’s what I want to be doing right now. Jut performing these songs.”

That’s not to say that she isn’t a serious songwriter and producer as well, as evidenced on standout songs like, ‘Beautiful World’ and ‘Electric Child’ where she displays her knack for hooky Americana and blistering Dead Weather-inspired riffage, respectively.

So what’s next for Anna Rose? “There’s a lot of stuff that didn’t make it on to this album that will be on another album pretty soon, so that’s exciting to know that there’s more material out there ready to go and that I’m really ready to write.”

Behold A Pale Horse is out now. - When The Gramophone Rings


""Behold A Pale Horse" Album Review"

Upon first hearing this album's title-track last summer we remarked on how Anna Rose seemed different to most of the rock-type singer-songwriters doing the rounds. This was reaffirmed by single 'Electric Child' earlier this year, and all of a sudden we found ourselves anticipating an album that seemed like it would be at odds with what we'd normally consider for inclusion on the site. Anna Rose has a mainstream sound, a fairly conventional rock sound, and also a very professional one. This isn't a lo-fi record, the production is more sanitised than the world's most pristine operating theatre. So what is it about Anna Rose that makes us ignore everything we stand for?

To be honest, I'm buggered if I know. There's just something about her songs, her attitude and her determination that draws you in and allows you to tolerate such a commercially-minded record. There's no reason why an alternative music site should be writing about clean rock/pop like 'Beautiful World' or 'Los Angeles', but that's the strange allure. Rose has a fine set of pipes on her and that voice can bring a touch of class to just about anything, and that's no slight on her songwriting which is exceptionally good despite being a style we wouldn't normally consider. 'Drive' and 'When The Wind' being prime examples that could be disasters in the wrong hands.

Part of the appeal may be the fact that Anna Rose doesn't just stick to these super shiny pop songs, she does allow blues, soul and desert rock to creep into the likes of 'Electric Child' and 'Show Me Those Hands', albeit in a less raw way that we may be used to. 'Swan Song' is another fine alt-rock track that straddles the world of the mainstream and the alternative, and whichever way you look at it, 'Shoot All The Lights' is a great piece of songwriting and the gritty 'Because Of You' is too. The moody 'Seven' is another song of note and takes you into a darker, more exciting world. So maybe that's Anna Rose's secret. She takes music that's often exploited and misused and carefully guides it back towards safety, not just by being a great singer, but by being able to write songs that are both commercial and credible at the same time, and that's not easy to do. - The Sound of Confusion


""Behold A Pale Horse" Album Review"

Upon first hearing this album's title-track last summer we remarked on how Anna Rose seemed different to most of the rock-type singer-songwriters doing the rounds. This was reaffirmed by single 'Electric Child' earlier this year, and all of a sudden we found ourselves anticipating an album that seemed like it would be at odds with what we'd normally consider for inclusion on the site. Anna Rose has a mainstream sound, a fairly conventional rock sound, and also a very professional one. This isn't a lo-fi record, the production is more sanitised than the world's most pristine operating theatre. So what is it about Anna Rose that makes us ignore everything we stand for?

To be honest, I'm buggered if I know. There's just something about her songs, her attitude and her determination that draws you in and allows you to tolerate such a commercially-minded record. There's no reason why an alternative music site should be writing about clean rock/pop like 'Beautiful World' or 'Los Angeles', but that's the strange allure. Rose has a fine set of pipes on her and that voice can bring a touch of class to just about anything, and that's no slight on her songwriting which is exceptionally good despite being a style we wouldn't normally consider. 'Drive' and 'When The Wind' being prime examples that could be disasters in the wrong hands.

Part of the appeal may be the fact that Anna Rose doesn't just stick to these super shiny pop songs, she does allow blues, soul and desert rock to creep into the likes of 'Electric Child' and 'Show Me Those Hands', albeit in a less raw way that we may be used to. 'Swan Song' is another fine alt-rock track that straddles the world of the mainstream and the alternative, and whichever way you look at it, 'Shoot All The Lights' is a great piece of songwriting and the gritty 'Because Of You' is too. The moody 'Seven' is another song of note and takes you into a darker, more exciting world. So maybe that's Anna Rose's secret. She takes music that's often exploited and misused and carefully guides it back towards safety, not just by being a great singer, but by being able to write songs that are both commercial and credible at the same time, and that's not easy to do. - The Sound of Confusion


"Exclusive Album Stream Premiere"

We first tipped you off to Anna Rose’s gorgeous stripped-down bluesy sound a month ago when we premiered “Behold a Pale Horse,” the title track off the New York singer’s sophomore album.

With a raw, rock and roll backbone and haunting melodies, the song is incredible enough in itself. But now, we’ve got something even better. Yep, we’re talking about the album! Behold a Pale Horse dropped this morning, and you can stream the record in all its soulful glory after the jump. Bliss out your Tuesday morning and press play below. –LIZA DARWIN - NYLON Magazine


"Exclusive Album Stream Premiere"

We first tipped you off to Anna Rose’s gorgeous stripped-down bluesy sound a month ago when we premiered “Behold a Pale Horse,” the title track off the New York singer’s sophomore album.

With a raw, rock and roll backbone and haunting melodies, the song is incredible enough in itself. But now, we’ve got something even better. Yep, we’re talking about the album! Behold a Pale Horse dropped this morning, and you can stream the record in all its soulful glory after the jump. Bliss out your Tuesday morning and press play below. –LIZA DARWIN - NYLON Magazine


"Singer/Songwriter Anna Rose Covers Arcade Fire"

As she works on the follow-up to her debut album, last year’s Nomad, singer/songwriter Anna Rose has recorded a striking, sensuous cover of Arcade Fire’s “My Body is a Cage,” which is currently available as a free MP3 download.

The way Arcade Fire plays it on Neon Bible, the song is fraught with manic, unnerving anguish; a nagging, clangorous thud incessantly ratcheting up the unease until an orchestral crescendo snuffs it out altogether.

Deconstructing it down to its rhythmic core, Anna Rose turns "My Body is a Cage" into something more carnal in comparison. The sonic chaos of the original is muted, yet its tension—like pent-up, erogenous longing—persists like a steady, pulsing ache for which there is no reprieve, much less a resolution.

In her live performances Anna Rose has covered tracks like “Jolene” (Dolly Parton) and “Manic Depression” (Jimi Hendrix), but “My Body is a Cage” is the first one of which she’s released a proper studio recording. It takes guts for an emerging artist to interpret a work by one of the most critically-acclaimed bands on the planet. And as with any cover the minimum objective is to at least do it justice; this artist has not only succeeded in that, but has put her own inspired stamp on the song as well.

Read more: http://blogcritics.org/music/article/singersongwriter-anna-rose-covers-arcade-fire/#ixzz1VITZxPOy
- Blogcritics


"An Interview With Anna Rose"

To borrow a phrase from one of her musical heroes, Anna Rose is set to break on through. Having spent years writing songs, studying the guitar, learning a bit of piano, and paying her dues on barroom stages in L.A. and New York, the 24-year-old singer/songwriter will release her self-titled debut on Tuesday. The 5-track EP reveals Anna Rose as an artist equally intuitive and proficient, imparting elements of classic-rock influence—like the slow, thick riff that anchors “Picture,” and the Winwood-esque organ refrain running through “Willshire Blvd.”—along with contemporary folk and pop distinctions. It’s a promising work that not only serves as an introduction of sorts, but also as a preview of her upcoming full-length album, Nomad.
Recorded with executive producer Bruce Botnick—whose extensive credits include such classics as The Doors’ L.A. Woman and Love’s Forever Changes—and with Anna Rose co-producing with Billy Sullivan, the LP is slated for release early next year.

In a conversation with Donald Gibson of Blogcritics Magazine, Anna Rose discusses her music and gives insight on how she approaches and appreciates her craft.
Where did the title for Nomad come from?
When I was recording the album, I was living in L.A., but I’d moved there with no friends or family. I moved there for college and then I ended up dropping out and pursued music full-time. But I was traveling a lot and I didn’t really stay in one place—even in L.A.—for more than two weeks to a month.

What did you learn in working with Bruce Botnick?
When I first started to record Nomad, I was nervous about wanting to do full takes and having my band do full takes over and over again because I didn’t want to cut certain things up; and having my lead guitarist do his solo for the song “Picture” over and over and over again until it had the perfect arc to it; and [I was] kind of nervous about asking people to do things, because my band is all guys and co-producer is a guy. I felt a little shy. And Bruce just made it very clear to me that “this is your album; this is your music. And you have to follow the vision that you have in your head.” Bruce has this incredible sense of where things should fit in the mix…He’s been doing it for so long that there are things that he just inherently knows.

As far as the craft of your songwriting, what do you find most challenging? What drives you?
Songwriting is challenging to begin with, for me. I grew up with a father who was a composer and a songwriter [Academy Award winning musician, Alan Menken]. And he’s given me a lot of valuable tools to keep the songwriting going. The foremost thing he’s done for me is be my dad…but he always supported my career and my desire to keep working, keep writing. [That] even when you feel like you don’t have something to write, you want to just put something down. Even if it sucks and it’s terrible and it’s the worst song you’ve ever heard. If it’s out of your system—at least this is my perception—if it’s out of my system, then I feel like the next thing I write will be amazing.

If you get anything that you would consider substandard out, then maybe that pushes the good stuff to come next.
Absolutely. I’m kind of in a period right now where I have about 50-60 other songs written that maybe I think are worthy of being put on a record. That being said, I kind of want my second record to be all new things that I’ve just written that are really about my life right now. And not everything’s about my life, but…

They’re things that you wouldn’t feel comfortable singing at this stage?
Yeah. There are certain songs that didn’t make it onto the record. There’s one song that’s called “Sleep’s Not Easy” and I didn’t put it on the record because I can’t relate to it anymore.

Was this something you’d written a long time ago?
Yeah, it was something I’d written when I was 16. And granted there are other songs that actually made it onto Nomad that I wrote when I was about 16 or 17 years old, but those songs are in a place where I can still relate to them. But “Sleep’s Not Easy” was a song that I couldn’t relate to anymore. And I’d rather have another artist—who can relate to it—sing it.

One song in particular on the EP that struck me was “You Got It For Free.” Is there a story behind that?
Some songs I don’t remember all that vividly where I wrote them because I write them over a period of time; “You Got It For Free” was a song that I remember exactly where I wrote it and I didn’t even have a guitar with me. I wrote the melody and wrote down the lyrics and then got my guitar was able to write it all out. But I already had the song in my head, which is kind of a rare thing for me… I was in Vermont and I was on a trip with my family. And it was in January; I remember it was freezing cold. It was one of those moments when I kind of woke up and I realized I’m really different from a lot of people (laughing)… I wanted to pursue music and I had gone to a high sch - Blogcritics


"An Interview With Anna Rose"

To borrow a phrase from one of her musical heroes, Anna Rose is set to break on through. Having spent years writing songs, studying the guitar, learning a bit of piano, and paying her dues on barroom stages in L.A. and New York, the 24-year-old singer/songwriter will release her self-titled debut on Tuesday. The 5-track EP reveals Anna Rose as an artist equally intuitive and proficient, imparting elements of classic-rock influence—like the slow, thick riff that anchors “Picture,” and the Winwood-esque organ refrain running through “Willshire Blvd.”—along with contemporary folk and pop distinctions. It’s a promising work that not only serves as an introduction of sorts, but also as a preview of her upcoming full-length album, Nomad.
Recorded with executive producer Bruce Botnick—whose extensive credits include such classics as The Doors’ L.A. Woman and Love’s Forever Changes—and with Anna Rose co-producing with Billy Sullivan, the LP is slated for release early next year.

In a conversation with Donald Gibson of Blogcritics Magazine, Anna Rose discusses her music and gives insight on how she approaches and appreciates her craft.
Where did the title for Nomad come from?
When I was recording the album, I was living in L.A., but I’d moved there with no friends or family. I moved there for college and then I ended up dropping out and pursued music full-time. But I was traveling a lot and I didn’t really stay in one place—even in L.A.—for more than two weeks to a month.

What did you learn in working with Bruce Botnick?
When I first started to record Nomad, I was nervous about wanting to do full takes and having my band do full takes over and over again because I didn’t want to cut certain things up; and having my lead guitarist do his solo for the song “Picture” over and over and over again until it had the perfect arc to it; and [I was] kind of nervous about asking people to do things, because my band is all guys and co-producer is a guy. I felt a little shy. And Bruce just made it very clear to me that “this is your album; this is your music. And you have to follow the vision that you have in your head.” Bruce has this incredible sense of where things should fit in the mix…He’s been doing it for so long that there are things that he just inherently knows.

As far as the craft of your songwriting, what do you find most challenging? What drives you?
Songwriting is challenging to begin with, for me. I grew up with a father who was a composer and a songwriter [Academy Award winning musician, Alan Menken]. And he’s given me a lot of valuable tools to keep the songwriting going. The foremost thing he’s done for me is be my dad…but he always supported my career and my desire to keep working, keep writing. [That] even when you feel like you don’t have something to write, you want to just put something down. Even if it sucks and it’s terrible and it’s the worst song you’ve ever heard. If it’s out of your system—at least this is my perception—if it’s out of my system, then I feel like the next thing I write will be amazing.

If you get anything that you would consider substandard out, then maybe that pushes the good stuff to come next.
Absolutely. I’m kind of in a period right now where I have about 50-60 other songs written that maybe I think are worthy of being put on a record. That being said, I kind of want my second record to be all new things that I’ve just written that are really about my life right now. And not everything’s about my life, but…

They’re things that you wouldn’t feel comfortable singing at this stage?
Yeah. There are certain songs that didn’t make it onto the record. There’s one song that’s called “Sleep’s Not Easy” and I didn’t put it on the record because I can’t relate to it anymore.

Was this something you’d written a long time ago?
Yeah, it was something I’d written when I was 16. And granted there are other songs that actually made it onto Nomad that I wrote when I was about 16 or 17 years old, but those songs are in a place where I can still relate to them. But “Sleep’s Not Easy” was a song that I couldn’t relate to anymore. And I’d rather have another artist—who can relate to it—sing it.

One song in particular on the EP that struck me was “You Got It For Free.” Is there a story behind that?
Some songs I don’t remember all that vividly where I wrote them because I write them over a period of time; “You Got It For Free” was a song that I remember exactly where I wrote it and I didn’t even have a guitar with me. I wrote the melody and wrote down the lyrics and then got my guitar was able to write it all out. But I already had the song in my head, which is kind of a rare thing for me… I was in Vermont and I was on a trip with my family. And it was in January; I remember it was freezing cold. It was one of those moments when I kind of woke up and I realized I’m really different from a lot of people (laughing)… I wanted to pursue music and I had gone to a high sch - Blogcritics


"Music Reviews: Anna Rose"

Anna Rose (EP) (Red Distribution)

Anna Rose Menken may only be 24 years old, however she must have one hell of a cool record collection. Her debut EP - which previews an upcoming full-length album - has lots of wise-beyond-her age influences shining through.
Rose is effortlessly able to create songs that feel like you have known them for years and at the same time feel totally new. A little Christine McVie here, a little Ann Wilson there, a bit of Nanci Griffith over there and a lot of Anna Rose all over the place.
The five-song sampler has some terrific modern folk rock, from the mid-tempo driving acoustic opener "Four Corners" to the complexly dark ballad "Picture" to the soft beauty of "Wilshire Blvd."
Anna Rose shows lots of promise for this young singer. I can't wait for a complete from her.

Jay S. Jacobs
- Pop Entertainment


"Music Reviews: Anna Rose"

Anna Rose (EP) (Red Distribution)

Anna Rose Menken may only be 24 years old, however she must have one hell of a cool record collection. Her debut EP - which previews an upcoming full-length album - has lots of wise-beyond-her age influences shining through.
Rose is effortlessly able to create songs that feel like you have known them for years and at the same time feel totally new. A little Christine McVie here, a little Ann Wilson there, a bit of Nanci Griffith over there and a lot of Anna Rose all over the place.
The five-song sampler has some terrific modern folk rock, from the mid-tempo driving acoustic opener "Four Corners" to the complexly dark ballad "Picture" to the soft beauty of "Wilshire Blvd."
Anna Rose shows lots of promise for this young singer. I can't wait for a complete from her.

Jay S. Jacobs
- Pop Entertainment


"Interview: Anna Rose"

Interview By: Alicia Strader
Interview Date: August 28, 2009


Your debut Self-titled EP comes out September 29, can you explain what the feel is or message behind it?
The EP is my way of introducing my music to the world. The five songs were taken from my full-length record, Nomad, which will be released next year. Deciding which songs to put on the EP was very difficult, but, ultimately, I felt that I wanted each song to reveal another layer of myself to the listener, almost like a conversation with a new friend.


How long did it take to complete? What was the experience like?
As I said above, the five songs on the EP were recorded as a part of my full-length record, Nomad. Making this record was incredible, it was a test of my patience and stamina because it took over a year to complete, but I feel like I achieved the sound I have been looking to get into a record for many years. My co-producer, Billy Sullivan, really pushed me to continue working even when I felt like I had nothing left to give and he taught me so much within the process. Bruce Botnick was also an invaluable asset and encouraged me to make the music sound the way I envisioned. I have gone into the studio with various other producers, but this was the first time that I took the reins a bit, which makes the final product that much more rewarding. I could not be more thrilled that this will be the first record I release. It feels right.


How would you describe your sound for someone who didn’t know your music?
I would describe it as a mix of folk, blues, pop and rock ‘n’ roll, I suppose, although I like to leave the door open to explore and push the boundaries of my own creativity. My goal is never to stop learning and evolving as a musician, which I am sure will change my songwriting along the way.


What is your favorite song off the EP?
Hah, I can’t say that! I don’t really have one. I go through periods in which I am more emotionally attached to one or the other, especially when I am playing a lot of live shows, but all my songs are important to me, even the terrible ones that don’t make it past the initial demo recordings.


Are your songs from personal experiences or do you draw in inspiration from pretty much anywhere?
I draw inspiration from a lot of different areas. My own life is a main source of material, but I find that my experiences become filtered through the lens of the unfamiliar. Sometimes I will write to leave my own life behind, but my emotions always sneak back in.


How does the creative process work for you?
That feels like such a personal question because I really value the overwhelming sense of becoming inspired and I crave it when I don’t feel it. What I have found, though, is that I enjoy writing the most when it is not something I have planned on. I love having a song idea or a melody or a chord progression hit me so hard that I can’t avoid it.


Who is your biggest inspiration? Did they motivate you to get your start in music?
I have been really lucky to learn from some unbelievable artists and musicians, but I could not answer this question any other way – my Dad. He believed in my music long before I did.


Was music something you’ve always wanted to be involved in? Did you want to be anything else when you were younger?
I can’t remember a time when music wasn’t at the forefront of my life. I always knew I would pursue it, despite having a first-hand viewing of the hardships. I rode horses for a long time, played a lot of different sports, but I would come home and pick up my guitar. I have been a dancer my whole life, though, and still work on my technique and choreography. I tried desperately to lead myself away from the music business by going to college (I studied in Los Angeles) but all I did was start playing gigs at crappy clubs on Sunset! I can’t help it, I love it.


You have been playing the guitar since you were 5 years old. Do you play any other instruments?
I played piano before I picked up the guitar and have come back to it in the past few years, but the guitar is a constant in my life. I have started writing on the piano, though, which is giving me a whole new approach. I would love to learn how to play as many instruments as I can, I think it will help my songwriting.


You said you won’t wear a dress onstage. What do you like to wear? Can you describe your style?
Let me clarify – I love dresses! I just can’t wear one when I play the guitar. If I were performing only as a vocalist, I think maybe I would consider a dress… but I would have to wear boots with it, hah. During a gig with my band, I usually wear black jeans and a tank top, maybe with a vest. My style is a bit split… I am kind of a tomboy but it makes it that much more exciting to put on a gorgeous dress and heels. I do love very high heels – I will always wear them. I think I may have come out of the womb in them… sorry, Mom.


What is your favorite city to play/visit? - For The Sound


"Interview: Anna Rose"

Interview By: Alicia Strader
Interview Date: August 28, 2009


Your debut Self-titled EP comes out September 29, can you explain what the feel is or message behind it?
The EP is my way of introducing my music to the world. The five songs were taken from my full-length record, Nomad, which will be released next year. Deciding which songs to put on the EP was very difficult, but, ultimately, I felt that I wanted each song to reveal another layer of myself to the listener, almost like a conversation with a new friend.


How long did it take to complete? What was the experience like?
As I said above, the five songs on the EP were recorded as a part of my full-length record, Nomad. Making this record was incredible, it was a test of my patience and stamina because it took over a year to complete, but I feel like I achieved the sound I have been looking to get into a record for many years. My co-producer, Billy Sullivan, really pushed me to continue working even when I felt like I had nothing left to give and he taught me so much within the process. Bruce Botnick was also an invaluable asset and encouraged me to make the music sound the way I envisioned. I have gone into the studio with various other producers, but this was the first time that I took the reins a bit, which makes the final product that much more rewarding. I could not be more thrilled that this will be the first record I release. It feels right.


How would you describe your sound for someone who didn’t know your music?
I would describe it as a mix of folk, blues, pop and rock ‘n’ roll, I suppose, although I like to leave the door open to explore and push the boundaries of my own creativity. My goal is never to stop learning and evolving as a musician, which I am sure will change my songwriting along the way.


What is your favorite song off the EP?
Hah, I can’t say that! I don’t really have one. I go through periods in which I am more emotionally attached to one or the other, especially when I am playing a lot of live shows, but all my songs are important to me, even the terrible ones that don’t make it past the initial demo recordings.


Are your songs from personal experiences or do you draw in inspiration from pretty much anywhere?
I draw inspiration from a lot of different areas. My own life is a main source of material, but I find that my experiences become filtered through the lens of the unfamiliar. Sometimes I will write to leave my own life behind, but my emotions always sneak back in.


How does the creative process work for you?
That feels like such a personal question because I really value the overwhelming sense of becoming inspired and I crave it when I don’t feel it. What I have found, though, is that I enjoy writing the most when it is not something I have planned on. I love having a song idea or a melody or a chord progression hit me so hard that I can’t avoid it.


Who is your biggest inspiration? Did they motivate you to get your start in music?
I have been really lucky to learn from some unbelievable artists and musicians, but I could not answer this question any other way – my Dad. He believed in my music long before I did.


Was music something you’ve always wanted to be involved in? Did you want to be anything else when you were younger?
I can’t remember a time when music wasn’t at the forefront of my life. I always knew I would pursue it, despite having a first-hand viewing of the hardships. I rode horses for a long time, played a lot of different sports, but I would come home and pick up my guitar. I have been a dancer my whole life, though, and still work on my technique and choreography. I tried desperately to lead myself away from the music business by going to college (I studied in Los Angeles) but all I did was start playing gigs at crappy clubs on Sunset! I can’t help it, I love it.


You have been playing the guitar since you were 5 years old. Do you play any other instruments?
I played piano before I picked up the guitar and have come back to it in the past few years, but the guitar is a constant in my life. I have started writing on the piano, though, which is giving me a whole new approach. I would love to learn how to play as many instruments as I can, I think it will help my songwriting.


You said you won’t wear a dress onstage. What do you like to wear? Can you describe your style?
Let me clarify – I love dresses! I just can’t wear one when I play the guitar. If I were performing only as a vocalist, I think maybe I would consider a dress… but I would have to wear boots with it, hah. During a gig with my band, I usually wear black jeans and a tank top, maybe with a vest. My style is a bit split… I am kind of a tomboy but it makes it that much more exciting to put on a gorgeous dress and heels. I do love very high heels – I will always wear them. I think I may have come out of the womb in them… sorry, Mom.


What is your favorite city to play/visit? - For The Sound


"EP Review"

“Anna Rose Menken, at age 24, has a powerful and emotive singing voice and some very legitimate writing chops. It’s tough for guitar-strumming singer/songwriters to emerge from a very crowded back, yet Anna Rose has the goods to do so.” - The Daily News (McKeesport, PA)


"EP Review"

“Anna Rose Menken, at age 24, has a powerful and emotive singing voice and some very legitimate writing chops. It’s tough for guitar-strumming singer/songwriters to emerge from a very crowded back, yet Anna Rose has the goods to do so.” - The Daily News (McKeesport, PA)


""My Body Is A Cage" Track Premiere"

Last we heard a “My Body Is a Cage” cover, Peter Gabriel was bringing his sweeping orchestral bombast to the Arcade Fire gem here. Now we have another version to compare it to. This one finds New York singer-songwriter Anna Rose bringing just as much passion with much less pomp. Her sparse cover showcases her effortlessly soulful singing and we’re proud to premiere it below.

“Choosing this song to cover came about quite organically,” Rose says about the cover. “It’s actually the only song that was arranged in the studio, rather than in the rehearsals prior to recording. I really love Arcade Fire and this is a song I had been tinkering around with for a while. Kevin Salem, the producer for this session, had heard me messing around and suggested we get a recording of it. There are some truly inspiring artists out there and it’s an honor to do my own version of My Body Is A Cage.”

Download “My Body Is a Cage” below. According to her Facebook, she’s also working on covers of “Dirty Diana” and “Jolene,” so keep an eye out for those as well. - Cover Me Songs


""Behold A Pale Horse" Single Review"

From Anna Rose's 2010 debut album 'Nomad' we learnt that the New York singer-songwriter was a little different from the glut of female solo artists out there, and now she looks to go one better with second album 'Behold A Pale Horse' which will be with us later in the summer. The album's title track also provides us with its first single, and true to her word the influence of greats such as Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan and Janis Joplin can be felt all over this track, which comes accompanied by a suitably moody and desolate video shot in Snowdonia and featuring, er, a black horse.

One thing's for certain, and that's that Anna Rose has a fine set of pipes and she puts them to good use on this rumbling and forbidding track, coming over like Florence if she'd sold her soul to the devil. 'Behold A Pale Horse', despite hardly being a potential summer smash, has a large catchment area. Rose takes in blues-rock as the base and there's some searing guitar work, but also creeping in are elements of folk, country, psychedelia and alt-rock. Rather than leaving her in a musical no man's land, there's enough guts and power here to impress fans of each. The album could be a belter. - The Sound Of Confusion


"Anna Rose Review"

All right. I’m basically a rocker at heart. If I have to listen to female singers, I prefer female rockers that can also deliver a ballad. After many years of listening to just about every genre on the planet, I’m very picky when it comes to personally judging female singers. Most of the female vocal renderings that find their way into my mailbox are lucky to survive the first few tracks on my CD player before I eject them. If there’s nothing catchy, original, or its just ballad folksinger stereotype rehash, out they go!

Anna Rose did pass the test. She held my interest. Not that her voice immediately grabbed me, but the material and delivery is interesting. A little Joni Mitchell, a little bit Heart, while changing speeds. What a concept on this compilation of songs (all written by Anna), storytelling without trashing the opposite sex. Who would’ve thunk it? The daughter of noted composer Alan Menken, she grew up playing first the piano, then guitar at the ripe old age of five. This EP is a prelude to the forthcoming release Nomad.
The Four Corners has that “Joni” feel to it, quick short phrasing playing off the clicking acoustic guitar backing. Picture is a sharply put together story tune. In The Morning View is an easygoing vocal driven, chord-thumping piece. Wilshire Blvd. is a nicely paced ballad, on which her voice comes off softer. You Got It For Free almost has that Celtic vibe (that I’ve grown to hate), but some clever guitar work pulls it out safely.
Arlen Roth of guitar lick teaching fame (that Anna calls her favorite guitarist) lends his talents to the disc. Easy to listen to, and catchy enough to put back in the machine for another go around. If she comes around, she’s worth catching. After all, her idol is Jimi Hendrix. That in itself should tell you something!
By Robert Engelman
- Skope Magazine


"Anna Rose Review"

All right. I’m basically a rocker at heart. If I have to listen to female singers, I prefer female rockers that can also deliver a ballad. After many years of listening to just about every genre on the planet, I’m very picky when it comes to personally judging female singers. Most of the female vocal renderings that find their way into my mailbox are lucky to survive the first few tracks on my CD player before I eject them. If there’s nothing catchy, original, or its just ballad folksinger stereotype rehash, out they go!

Anna Rose did pass the test. She held my interest. Not that her voice immediately grabbed me, but the material and delivery is interesting. A little Joni Mitchell, a little bit Heart, while changing speeds. What a concept on this compilation of songs (all written by Anna), storytelling without trashing the opposite sex. Who would’ve thunk it? The daughter of noted composer Alan Menken, she grew up playing first the piano, then guitar at the ripe old age of five. This EP is a prelude to the forthcoming release Nomad.
The Four Corners has that “Joni” feel to it, quick short phrasing playing off the clicking acoustic guitar backing. Picture is a sharply put together story tune. In The Morning View is an easygoing vocal driven, chord-thumping piece. Wilshire Blvd. is a nicely paced ballad, on which her voice comes off softer. You Got It For Free almost has that Celtic vibe (that I’ve grown to hate), but some clever guitar work pulls it out safely.
Arlen Roth of guitar lick teaching fame (that Anna calls her favorite guitarist) lends his talents to the disc. Easy to listen to, and catchy enough to put back in the machine for another go around. If she comes around, she’s worth catching. After all, her idol is Jimi Hendrix. That in itself should tell you something!
By Robert Engelman
- Skope Magazine


"Coffee Date With Anna Rose"

We sit down with the rocker, we chat, and it’s like we’ve known her forever.

It’s one of the hottest days of the summer and I am set to meet singer Anna Rose. We agree to meet at a Starbucks around the corner from where she lives. I first meet her PR girl, after we stumble into each other, thankfully, since she was expecting a girl with a pixie cut. We talk like girlfriends and she is lovely, and tells me about Anna Rose and why she is special and she says she sets herself a part from other musicians. She has worked with her for many years and says the growth within her music has been amazing to watch. The compliments keep flowing about the singer and I’m thinking to myself “I really hope all this is true,” because this will make for a better cup of coffee. Anna Rose walks through the door (she doesn’t strut like other musicians) so I already think, this girl is just a New York City down to earth chic. She apologizes profusely for being late (she’s a little over five minutes late) and there is no forgiveness needed. She is wide-eyed, and gives out hugs like we have been friends for years – she is engaging and welcoming. So I have to give it up to the PR rep immediately for preparing me for an easy and light-hearted 20 minutes. I know one thing from talking to Anna: she loves music. It trickles through her veins; she might as well be a walking album. I think among everything, she doesn’t make it a priority, it just is for her. She didn’t pick to be a musician, she just was one. — Emily Marucci

SHK: I WANT TO START OFF IN THE BEGINNING… SO TELL ME THE FIRST CD YOU EVER BOUGHT THAT REALLY INFLUENCED YOU?

ANNA ROSE: Oh man, you know, I probably stole my first CD from my dad was really what it was [I’m just gonna take this up to my room]. I honestly think it was Beatles Rubber Soul. But it started with Beatles and The Doors, and then went very quickly the Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin. I was one of those little kids that was listening to music not from my time, but I also have a 90’s child in me. I loved Nirvana. I rocked my flannel pretty hard as a young child. I remember Kurt Cobain’s death very distinctly.

DO YOU REMEMBER HIS DEATH AND BEING SAD ABOUT IT?

It was around the time where a lot of different people in my life died so it was an aspect of it. This album actually is sort of a process of dealing with those things that I probably never dealt with when I was younger. It’s a heavier record in that way I suppose, but in my heart it feels light. It feels like coming through all of these thoughts.

I READ THAT A LOT OF THE ALBUM IS ABOUT DEATH, AND YOUR’E SAYING THAT THE ABLUM FEELS LIGHT TO YOU, WAS IT A HEALING PROCESS?

I think it’s learning to understand it, and to me, I don’t believe that death is the dying of something. It’s the beginning of something else, a different phase of your life, or someone moving on to another place of existence — in my mind. It’s also my process. Listening to all these of folk musicians. These blue musicians and jazz musicians. Throughout the world, music is an incredible healing entity. It’s a universal language. I went and listened to all these songs that had a theme of death. Jim Morrison always played with the idea of death and moving on. I really love Sun House, he has a song called “Death Letter That I Love.” Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy. It’s a topic that is explored a lot in music and I sort of wanted to come back to that. I pull so much from those artists and it felt to me that if I wanted to stake my claim in the industry I had to tackle these topics.

DO YOU SIT DOWN AND DELIBERATELY WRITE A SONG OR ARE YOU ON A TRAIN JOTTING THINGS DOWN AND SCRIBBLING ON HOTEL NOTEPADS?

I am always jotting things down lyrically. I can feel a song forming lyrically and where I want it to go. Musically, I am a little more focused because it’s very easy to go that jam band route of like “this sounds really cool man lets vibe on this,” kinda thing. I’m more of a pop writer that way and more of songwriter in a traditional sense that I put some discipline to it because I think listeners deserve that. There’s a lot of stuff out there that isn’t going to last. I want people to listen to this record in 10 years and it still be relevant. And I think that’s really what the record is about — legacy. The legacy you leave here when you go to whatever place you are going to go to.

SO I WANT TO TALK ABOUT YOUR FATHER A LITTLE BIT… (DISNEY COMPOSER ALAN MENKEN).

Big Al! Special man!

SO, YOU SANG FOR SOME OF HIS MOVIES, WAS HE PRESENT IN THE STUDIO?

Yeah he’ll be recording the piano demos for the songs, and I’ll come in and do the vocal parts for the female characters and they will take those demos and produce them for the artist who comes in to do it. It was always fun for me, it’s a way to be someone else, to get into character…

He’s a good guy. He’s a good dad. He and my mom. My mom was dancer. They always supported me unconditionally. They always believ - Seen Heard Known


""Behold A Pale Horse" Free Download"

Anna Rose is a singer-songwriter who balances the grit and attitude of pure American rock ‘n’ roll with gorgeously constructed songs and a softer emotional center. Today she offers up a free download of the song ‘Behold a Pale Horse,’ the title track from her upcoming record.

Rose released her debut full-length ‘Nomad’ in 2010 and turned a lot of heads with a particularly soulful cover of Arcade Fire‘s ‘My Body Is a Cage.’ On ‘Behold a Pale Horse,’ she previews the same sense of soulfulness from her new record.

“I’m so happy to share the title track from my upcoming album, ‘Behold a Pale Horse,’ with you,” she tells Diffuser.fm readers. “I began writing this song right after the release of my first record, ‘Nomad.’ Though I didn’t know it at the time, writing this song brought forth the concept for my whole next album, so what better song for you to hear first! Thank you for listening!”

You heard it here first — grab a free download of ‘Behold A Pale Horse’ below.

free mp3 download - Diffuser FM


"'My Body Is A Cage' Video Premiere"

Folkie Anna Rose has some serious relationship troubles in the video for her cover of the Arcade Fire classic. - NME


"'My Body Is A Cage' Video Premiere"

Folkie Anna Rose has some serious relationship troubles in the video for her cover of the Arcade Fire classic. - NME


"Blues in the City: Anna Rose Announces Sophomore Album"

Those who (like me) spend their life going through press releases and music submissions tend to develop often misleading snap judgment tendencies. When I read NYC songstress Anna Rose's name in my Inbox I expected your typical, a little generic, slightly boring singer songwriter - maybe because her name is a little... effortless? But the lady's music proved me wrong. Admittedly, Anna doesn't play the most outrageously innovative of genres - modern blues - but she does it with style. She recently got a good amount of press because of this video of a cover of "My Body is a Cage" by Arcade Fire, which she reinterpreted with a delicate, sparse and sober touch reminiscent of The Cowboy Junkies. Now she's releasing another video, for the the title track of her forthcoming album "Behold a Pale Horse," due out later this year. - The Deli Magazine


"Blues in the City: Anna Rose Announces Sophomore Album"

Those who (like me) spend their life going through press releases and music submissions tend to develop often misleading snap judgment tendencies. When I read NYC songstress Anna Rose's name in my Inbox I expected your typical, a little generic, slightly boring singer songwriter - maybe because her name is a little... effortless? But the lady's music proved me wrong. Admittedly, Anna doesn't play the most outrageously innovative of genres - modern blues - but she does it with style. She recently got a good amount of press because of this video of a cover of "My Body is a Cage" by Arcade Fire, which she reinterpreted with a delicate, sparse and sober touch reminiscent of The Cowboy Junkies. Now she's releasing another video, for the the title track of her forthcoming album "Behold a Pale Horse," due out later this year. - The Deli Magazine


""Behold A Pale Horse" Video Premiere"

Ever since listening to Anna Rose’s debut album Nomad,
we’ve had a feeling we’d be hearing a lot more of the bluesy New York-based singer.

Sure enough, Rose’s sophomore album, Behold a Pale Horse, is due out at the end of the summer.

But because we know you hate waiting,
we thought we’d give you a taste of what the blonde, bright-eyed rocker has in store…

Shot in Snowdonia, Wales, the new video for the title track of her upcoming album is seriously gorgeous, slightly haunting, and will likely leave you wanting more. - NYLON Magazine


""Behold A Pale Horse" Video Premiere"

Ever since listening to Anna Rose’s debut album Nomad,
we’ve had a feeling we’d be hearing a lot more of the bluesy New York-based singer.

Sure enough, Rose’s sophomore album, Behold a Pale Horse, is due out at the end of the summer.

But because we know you hate waiting,
we thought we’d give you a taste of what the blonde, bright-eyed rocker has in store…

Shot in Snowdonia, Wales, the new video for the title track of her upcoming album is seriously gorgeous, slightly haunting, and will likely leave you wanting more. - NYLON Magazine


"La Vie En Rose"

You are going to want to get to know New York-based rocker Anna Rose. Her single “Behold a Pale Horse”, off the upcoming album of the same name, opens with a haunting bass line, which sets the stage for the 1-2 punch of Rose’s vocals. Her dark and deep sound is reminiscent of Heart's Ann Wilson (remember “Barracuda” and “Magic Man”?). The song's thick, heavy tone is appropriate considering the subject matter: the title comes from the Book of Revelations, with the pale horse acting as a personification of death. Creepy, but cool.

Be sure to take a listen to the single and check out Behold a Pale Horse, which will be hitting shelves and iTunes early this fall! Also, check out Anna Rose live at the NYC Bowery Electric on Wednesday, September 12th at 9pm. - BUST Magazine


"Anna Rose, Don't Let The Name Fool You"

Anna Rose: Don’t Let The Name Fool You

—by Sara Fazio, September 5, 2012

The soft and girly name is just a front. The gritty rock and roll woman behind it is a whole other story. Her strong vocals and passion for music turn this woman into a true musician. This 27-year-old singer-songwriter has a different style than most. Her music has a touch of rock and roll, a pinch of blues, and a slight indie vibe. Growing up around music, as her father is an Oscar-winning composer for world-famous Disney, she has always had the passion. See Anna Rose play at the Bowery Electric in Manhattan on Sept. 12. - The Aquarian Weekly


"Anna Rose: Behold A Pale Horse"

From Anna Rose's 2010 debut album 'Nomad' we learnt that the New York singer-songwriter was a little different from the glut of female solo artists out there, and now she looks to go one better with second album 'Behold A Pale Horse' which will be with us later in the summer. The album's title track also provides us with its first single, and true to her word the influence of greats such as Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan and Janis Joplin can be felt all over this track, which comes accompanied by a suitably moody and desolate video shot in Snowdonia and featuring, er, a black horse.

One thing's for certain, and that's that Anna Rose has a fine set of pipes and she puts them to good use on this rumbling and forbidding track, coming over like Florence if she'd sold her soul to the devil. 'Behold A Pale Horse', despite hardly being a potential summer smash, has a large catchment area. Rose takes in blues-rock as the base and there's some searing guitar work, but also creeping in are elements of folk, country, psychedelia and alt-rock. Rather than leaving her in a musical no man's land, there's enough guts and power here to impress fans of each. The album could be a belter. - Sounds XP


"Anna Rose: Behold A Pale Horse"

From Anna Rose's 2010 debut album 'Nomad' we learnt that the New York singer-songwriter was a little different from the glut of female solo artists out there, and now she looks to go one better with second album 'Behold A Pale Horse' which will be with us later in the summer. The album's title track also provides us with its first single, and true to her word the influence of greats such as Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan and Janis Joplin can be felt all over this track, which comes accompanied by a suitably moody and desolate video shot in Snowdonia and featuring, er, a black horse.

One thing's for certain, and that's that Anna Rose has a fine set of pipes and she puts them to good use on this rumbling and forbidding track, coming over like Florence if she'd sold her soul to the devil. 'Behold A Pale Horse', despite hardly being a potential summer smash, has a large catchment area. Rose takes in blues-rock as the base and there's some searing guitar work, but also creeping in are elements of folk, country, psychedelia and alt-rock. Rather than leaving her in a musical no man's land, there's enough guts and power here to impress fans of each. The album could be a belter. - Sounds XP


"Anna Rose, 'Behold a Pale Horse' -- Video of the Day"

Artist: Anna Rose
Video: "Behold a Pale Horse"
Highlight: "Making this video was truly a labor of love for both Jennifer Tzar, the director, and myself," Anna Rose tells Spinner. "The concept had been in my head since the recording process began and once I sat down with Jennifer, everything materialized in such a beautiful way because she loved the idea as much as I did. The final element that brought it all together, though, was the location: Snowdonia, Wales. That place gave us every season and every bit of magic it had in the few days we were there, of which I am so grateful."
- AOL Spinner


"Anna Rose, 'Behold a Pale Horse' -- Video of the Day"

Artist: Anna Rose
Video: "Behold a Pale Horse"
Highlight: "Making this video was truly a labor of love for both Jennifer Tzar, the director, and myself," Anna Rose tells Spinner. "The concept had been in my head since the recording process began and once I sat down with Jennifer, everything materialized in such a beautiful way because she loved the idea as much as I did. The final element that brought it all together, though, was the location: Snowdonia, Wales. That place gave us every season and every bit of magic it had in the few days we were there, of which I am so grateful."
- AOL Spinner


"Anna Rose: Genre Crossing Her Way to Success"

Take Paula Cole, Christina Aguilera and Reba McEntire and mix them up in a blender. The power house voice that pours out is Anna Rose. Meet the vivacious woman with a mystical energy behind the amazing song, “My Body is a Cage.”

Nicole: I have been so anxious to talk to you because I want to know the story…your voice from one song to the next…wow! Takes me different places and I can’t wait to hear what drives you and your creative process.

Anna Rose: Oh! Thank you, that’s so nice, thank you! It’s such a compliment, I really appreciate that.

Nicole: You’re welcome.

Anna Rose: What I can tell you?

Nicole: I’m listening to “Beautiful World” and I hear this country feel to it, right? Definitely rock, with a bit of country rock to it and then I hear a bold, clear voice and I’m hearing Reba McEntire. The power of your voice is insane.

Anna Rose: Wow. Thank you.

Nicole: Then I get to “My Body is a Cage” …which I’ve been listening to on repeat, it’s so good, and I’m hearing Paula Cole. Has anyone compared that song, your voice in that song, to Paula Cole before?

Anna Rose: No…Wow!

Nicole: I just, I’m blown away by the power in your voice, and I’m just wondering if you started training when you were younger. How did this develop?

Anna Rose: I was really always more involved personally with Rock n’ Roll. On a professional level, I knew I wanted to sing. I wanted to be a songwriter, I was playing guitar, I knew I wanted to be a musician. I was going to do that any way that I could and get experience any place that I could. For people that really gave me a chance were…with Disney they allowed me to sing the demos for some songs, for my Dad. His studio was at my parents’ house so I would just go up to my Dad’s office and sing a little and you know, go on my merry way which was pretty cool.

Nicole: Ya think!?

Anna Rose: I mean, it was such an interesting experience because I think I made it known that that was what I wanted to do. Thankfully, my dad took me seriously and really allowed me to explore all the avenues besides performance from a really early age. I’ve kind of known what I’m getting into for a while. It’s not the easiest of businesses.

Nicole: You might have jumped on the Disney bandwagon and gone aggressively that route, likely with your Dad’s connections, you could have pushed through that way. Was there a reason that you didn’t go that way? Was it not your interest or what he thought was good for you?

Anna Rose: I love Disney and I love what they do, I kind of knew it was never going to be for me, I’m a different animal. I knew I was going to be involved in Rock n’ Roll, I also didn’t want my father’s name to have an influence, as much as possible, I didn’t want it to have an influence over what people thought of me. His music is very different from mine and while I love my Dad dearly and have so much respect for him, I have a very different musical aesthetic and I think, I wanted to remove myself as much as possible from any comparison that could come.

Nicole: You said that you’ve been influenced by the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, Stevie Nicks, Janis Joplin. What’s on your playlist now?

Anna Rose: Right now? Let’s see, I was actually just looking at this before I got on the phone with you because every time someone asks me what I’m listening to. I listen to a lot of different stuff and I find influences in a lot of different areas. I love R&B and old Soul and Heavy Metal even. I run the gamut, but right now my playlist definitely has a lot of Tom Waits, the new Jack White record, the solo record, Blunderbuss…there’s always some Kills on there. Then Hunters and the band Jeff the Brotherhood. Both of those bands I’ve seen live and they’re unreal, they’re really good.

Nicole: Do you listen to full albums or do you skip around song to song?


Anna Rose: I have different ways of listening to music: I will listen to an album all the way through…with Blunderbuss that’s an album all the way through for me. Then I’ll pick and choose… It’s a great record and there’s so much diversity in it. I mean, it’s really, it takes, you actually understand so much about his different bands through the slow record and I find it really interesting to dive into an artist like that. On the other side of things, I really do like making playlists for myself. I’ll pick and choose what songs I’m sort of responding to from a record or I’ll go through Spotify and I’ll let Spotify kind of just take me where I want it to take me. Wherever it wants to go, or Pandora or something like that, and I’ll pull songs from that and I’ll make a whole big playlist. Then I’ll start breaking down that playlist and thinking about what song I’m responding to the most, what song I can’t get out of my head and why it might be that way. For me there’s a lot of research behind it too, as a songwriter you kind of want to. I take my craft seriously in that way, but I want to know why people are r - Life of a Rock Star


"Anna Rose: Genre Crossing Her Way to Success"

Take Paula Cole, Christina Aguilera and Reba McEntire and mix them up in a blender. The power house voice that pours out is Anna Rose. Meet the vivacious woman with a mystical energy behind the amazing song, “My Body is a Cage.”

Nicole: I have been so anxious to talk to you because I want to know the story…your voice from one song to the next…wow! Takes me different places and I can’t wait to hear what drives you and your creative process.

Anna Rose: Oh! Thank you, that’s so nice, thank you! It’s such a compliment, I really appreciate that.

Nicole: You’re welcome.

Anna Rose: What I can tell you?

Nicole: I’m listening to “Beautiful World” and I hear this country feel to it, right? Definitely rock, with a bit of country rock to it and then I hear a bold, clear voice and I’m hearing Reba McEntire. The power of your voice is insane.

Anna Rose: Wow. Thank you.

Nicole: Then I get to “My Body is a Cage” …which I’ve been listening to on repeat, it’s so good, and I’m hearing Paula Cole. Has anyone compared that song, your voice in that song, to Paula Cole before?

Anna Rose: No…Wow!

Nicole: I just, I’m blown away by the power in your voice, and I’m just wondering if you started training when you were younger. How did this develop?

Anna Rose: I was really always more involved personally with Rock n’ Roll. On a professional level, I knew I wanted to sing. I wanted to be a songwriter, I was playing guitar, I knew I wanted to be a musician. I was going to do that any way that I could and get experience any place that I could. For people that really gave me a chance were…with Disney they allowed me to sing the demos for some songs, for my Dad. His studio was at my parents’ house so I would just go up to my Dad’s office and sing a little and you know, go on my merry way which was pretty cool.

Nicole: Ya think!?

Anna Rose: I mean, it was such an interesting experience because I think I made it known that that was what I wanted to do. Thankfully, my dad took me seriously and really allowed me to explore all the avenues besides performance from a really early age. I’ve kind of known what I’m getting into for a while. It’s not the easiest of businesses.

Nicole: You might have jumped on the Disney bandwagon and gone aggressively that route, likely with your Dad’s connections, you could have pushed through that way. Was there a reason that you didn’t go that way? Was it not your interest or what he thought was good for you?

Anna Rose: I love Disney and I love what they do, I kind of knew it was never going to be for me, I’m a different animal. I knew I was going to be involved in Rock n’ Roll, I also didn’t want my father’s name to have an influence, as much as possible, I didn’t want it to have an influence over what people thought of me. His music is very different from mine and while I love my Dad dearly and have so much respect for him, I have a very different musical aesthetic and I think, I wanted to remove myself as much as possible from any comparison that could come.

Nicole: You said that you’ve been influenced by the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, Stevie Nicks, Janis Joplin. What’s on your playlist now?

Anna Rose: Right now? Let’s see, I was actually just looking at this before I got on the phone with you because every time someone asks me what I’m listening to. I listen to a lot of different stuff and I find influences in a lot of different areas. I love R&B and old Soul and Heavy Metal even. I run the gamut, but right now my playlist definitely has a lot of Tom Waits, the new Jack White record, the solo record, Blunderbuss…there’s always some Kills on there. Then Hunters and the band Jeff the Brotherhood. Both of those bands I’ve seen live and they’re unreal, they’re really good.

Nicole: Do you listen to full albums or do you skip around song to song?


Anna Rose: I have different ways of listening to music: I will listen to an album all the way through…with Blunderbuss that’s an album all the way through for me. Then I’ll pick and choose… It’s a great record and there’s so much diversity in it. I mean, it’s really, it takes, you actually understand so much about his different bands through the slow record and I find it really interesting to dive into an artist like that. On the other side of things, I really do like making playlists for myself. I’ll pick and choose what songs I’m sort of responding to from a record or I’ll go through Spotify and I’ll let Spotify kind of just take me where I want it to take me. Wherever it wants to go, or Pandora or something like that, and I’ll pull songs from that and I’ll make a whole big playlist. Then I’ll start breaking down that playlist and thinking about what song I’m responding to the most, what song I can’t get out of my head and why it might be that way. For me there’s a lot of research behind it too, as a songwriter you kind of want to. I take my craft seriously in that way, but I want to know why people are r - Life of a Rock Star


"Anna Rose: “My Body Is A Cage” (Arcade Fire Cover)"

Anna Rose has some gumption. The Manhattan songstress has taken the organ breeding closer to Arcade Fire’s 2007 Neon Bible, and stripped it down for the copper piping: i.e. the lyrics. Her new version for “My Body Is A Cage” is a sordid ballad that focuses more on the “cagey” and less on the “set my body free-eee” part. Her voice is distinctive and she’s got the atmosphere and charisma to house plenty of fans. Shame it took such a damp cover to get our attention though. The rest of her catalogue is much, much easier on your mood. Still, if you’re already in the dumps, this song will do nothing to dissuade you from staying there. - The Wounded Jukebox


"Anna Rose: “My Body Is A Cage” (Arcade Fire Cover)"

Anna Rose has some gumption. The Manhattan songstress has taken the organ breeding closer to Arcade Fire’s 2007 Neon Bible, and stripped it down for the copper piping: i.e. the lyrics. Her new version for “My Body Is A Cage” is a sordid ballad that focuses more on the “cagey” and less on the “set my body free-eee” part. Her voice is distinctive and she’s got the atmosphere and charisma to house plenty of fans. Shame it took such a damp cover to get our attention though. The rest of her catalogue is much, much easier on your mood. Still, if you’re already in the dumps, this song will do nothing to dissuade you from staying there. - The Wounded Jukebox


"Mp3-pack, Covers Dept."

Folk rock songstress Anna Rose is currently working on a follow-up to her 2010 album, “Nomad,” and in anticipation of new tracks she’s offered this haunting version of the Arcade Fire classic “My Body is a Cage.” There’s minimal instrumentation in comparison to Arcade Fire’s original orchestration, but her soulful vocals make it an interesting listen — especially when paired up with the video shot by famed director Moh Azima. - Buzz Bands LA


"Mp3-pack, Covers Dept."

Folk rock songstress Anna Rose is currently working on a follow-up to her 2010 album, “Nomad,” and in anticipation of new tracks she’s offered this haunting version of the Arcade Fire classic “My Body is a Cage.” There’s minimal instrumentation in comparison to Arcade Fire’s original orchestration, but her soulful vocals make it an interesting listen — especially when paired up with the video shot by famed director Moh Azima. - Buzz Bands LA


"A-Sides With Jon Chattman: Eve to Adam, Anna Rose, and Grace Weber Go It Acoustic"

An inspired collection of songs she wrote on her journey into the music business and her life experiences, the album was more poignant than it was hard rocking. That's about to change. Rose said her next album, which will be released in early 2012, will be closer to alt rock than the "singer/songwritery" vibe of Nomad. We're getting a sneak preview of what's to come now.

Earlier this month, the musician released a video for her sultry cover of Arcade Fire's "My Body is a Cage" on NME. Her interpretation of the song has gone viral, earning critical acclaim, and more importantly, has received a thumbs-up from that Canadian wonder band.

- Huffington Post


"A-Sides With Jon Chattman: Eve to Adam, Anna Rose, and Grace Weber Go It Acoustic"

An inspired collection of songs she wrote on her journey into the music business and her life experiences, the album was more poignant than it was hard rocking. That's about to change. Rose said her next album, which will be released in early 2012, will be closer to alt rock than the "singer/songwritery" vibe of Nomad. We're getting a sneak preview of what's to come now.

Earlier this month, the musician released a video for her sultry cover of Arcade Fire's "My Body is a Cage" on NME. Her interpretation of the song has gone viral, earning critical acclaim, and more importantly, has received a thumbs-up from that Canadian wonder band.

- Huffington Post


"Four New Songs Worth A Listen"

A sparse, aching cover of an Arcade Fire tune, without the original’s spooky organ. Though the song’s protagonist is paralyzed and limited, the sultry pipes of the singer-songwriter from New York are in fine working order. - The Globe and Mail (Canada)


"Soulful Songbird Anna Rose Covers Arcade Fire's "My Body Is a Cage""

This is an absolutely gorgeous cover of Arcade Fire's "My Body Is a Cage" by up and coming folk-rock goddess Anna Rose. This tune is perfectly suited to Rose's lush, soulful vocals, especially when stripped down to even sparer instrumentation than the original; just beautiful. - What's The Ruckus


"Anna Rose: Another Budding Flower"

By: Alycia Abreu
September 19, 2009

Anna Rose isn’t your typical girl with a guitar. Backed by a band of four guys who add a combination of harmonizing vocals and rugged guitar playing, Anna Rose has the perfect mix of sour and sweet. She will be playing The Gramercy in NYC with Die Pretty on Sept. 21 in preparation for the release of her EP. Admission is $10. annarosemusic.com.
- The Aquarian Weekly


"Anna Rose: Another Budding Flower"

By: Alycia Abreu
September 19, 2009

Anna Rose isn’t your typical girl with a guitar. Backed by a band of four guys who add a combination of harmonizing vocals and rugged guitar playing, Anna Rose has the perfect mix of sour and sweet. She will be playing The Gramercy in NYC with Die Pretty on Sept. 21 in preparation for the release of her EP. Admission is $10. annarosemusic.com.
- The Aquarian Weekly


"ANNA ROSE Debut Self-titled EP Out September 29"

Anna Rose can too easily be described as a “singer-songwriter” but I invite you to take a listen to the song below and really see how Anna crosses new boundaries. As you listen to Anna's forthcoming self-titled EP, you can hear her influences - Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin- not necessarily traditional female singers of yore. One of her biggest influences is her mentor Arlen Roth, the celebrated guitarist who has performed with the likes of Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and many more. She calls him "the best living guitarist on the face of the planet."

Anna has been playing guitar since she was 5 years old - the result of a family holiday swap actually gone right. "I just picked it up," she remembers, "My cousin taught me a G-chord...I just loved it." Anna is a self-proclaimed gearhead, almost never being seen without a guitar slung over her shoulder. Brought up in a musical household, her father a composer and mother a ballet dancer, she was encouraged to nurse her musical talent.

Now, at 24, Anna is ready to show the world her heart and soul on her debut self-titled EP. The EP, out September 29th via White Pony through RED is comprised of five songs from her upcoming album Nomad, which she co-produced with Billy Sullivan (Bruce Botnick served as executive producer.)



August 4, 2009
- Altsounds


"Getting to Know: Anna Rose"

By Farah Joan Fard November 8, 2009

Innovator and musician Les Paul once said about playing guitar, “It’s not technique — it’s what you have to say”. Judging from her music, guitarist and singer Anna Rose has a lot to say. From everything to music technology, gender gaps in the industry, musical theater and sight reading-she hit the nail on the head. The daughter of a ballet dancer and composer Alan Menken, Anna Rose grew up in an artistic and musical environment. First introduced to the guitar at age 5, she is now wowing audiences with her solid voice and musical skill. Her upcoming debut, ‘Nomad’, was co-produced with William (Billy) Sullivan, and includes five songs from her current EP.

BLAST: I appreciated that in your bio you mention that your musical process includes “full takes, no Auto-Tune, and maybe one synthesizer”. What do you think of the use of technology in music and recording these days?
Anna Rose: You know, I think the use of technology is wonderful, but personally I don’t think I have the experience to put it to its full use. My experience lies in playing guitar and singing and doing things live. The best way to capture what I do is capturing things in full takes…I don’t think there is anything wrong with Auto-tune (but) I choose not to use it in my work…it’s dishonest for me.

BLAST: I like your quote about wearing dresses. It really struck me because as a drummer wearing a dress is not much of an option. Do you feel like there is an assumption of how a female musician should look on stage?
AR: Absolutely. I think that there is still that stigma of female musicians kinda just being the figurehead of a great operation…the puppet. I don’t think that’s the case with every musician…I think every great female artist has fought against it…I fight against it all the time. Keith Richards can get up in a T-shirt and jeans…if a girl does that it’s like she didn’t get dressed up for the occasion.

BLAST: That being said, do you feel there is a divide between men and women in the field of rock and music? Or does bringing it up create that divide?
AR: You know, I work well with male musicians, my band is all guys. Personally, I’ve found I end up working with male musicians. That being said I know of brilliant female musicians I would love to work with. Good music is good music. The important thing is to let your music be the most important part of it. That’s what bridges the gap. It’s important for music to just be music, and not just an industry of people trying to be cool.

BLAST: So you started on piano. Do you read music or do you feel you learn and write more by ear?
AR: I don’t read music, I read tablature for guitar, but I really do everything by ear primarily. I don’t want to advocate people not learning music, it’s important for certain paths….my particular path as a writer doesn’t necessarily require that.

BLAST: A lot of guitarists strive on soloing. (The solo on Picture is awesome—reminds me of Voodoo Child Slight Return there) What do you think about that? Is there too much of a focus on soloing in the guitar world?
AR: Well, first, that solo isn’t me…that solo is my lead guitarist, Adam Stoler, he’s my musical director for my band. My whole band is comprised of some (great) musicians…but I’m a rhythm player through and through. I think soloing is important …it’s a different animal than playing rhythm guitar. You’re kind of born to be a solo player or a rhythm player…it’s just never been my thing. But I envision for sure.

BLAST: Ok, random question. Are there any guitar riffs you’d rather not hear again?
AR: I can’t think of any off the top of my head! That’s an awesome question! I hate guitar riffs with a lot of chorus on them or chamber…anything ‘chorusy’ or ethereal…unless it’s meant for a certain sound effect. Oh! The theme from the original Beverly Hills 90210…but I also obsessively watch it. Maybe that’s my own fault.

BLAST: In another interview you stated that though you idolize a lot of artists from the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ’70s that you listen to, and recording one of their songs would be blasphemous in a way. What do you think of all the remakes of Beatles songs and the all the things like Rockband & even the film Across the Universe, which take from these artists?
AR: Across the Universe was really well done…with unique takes (on those songs). Covering someone else’s song, when it’s your own take on it….is homage to that artist. When you’re redoing a song that was made famous by Johnny Cash or something…you need to have your own unique stance on it. Personally I think I’m too young and early in my career to have the right to do that. I need to explore my own creativity and have a couple of pieces of my own work out there before I can say I am good enough to cover someone’s song. I have too much respect of that work to even go near it, though I do cover things live but I won’t record them

BLAST: Your father has written many pieces for film a - Blast Magazine


"A Rose By Any Other Name..."

Blonde-haired beauty, Anna Rose is not your average 24-year old singer, songwriter, guitarist. Beneath her gentle exterior lies a hard-core rock ‘n roll chick. Born in Manhattan but raised in upstate New York, Rose has channeled her love for classic rock into an organic and paisley printed fabrication. Inspired by the thoughtful and carefree California of the 60’s and 70’s, she sings of light hearted lyrics while strumming along to groovy bohemian beats. With the recent release of her debut self-titled EP, Anna Rose bares her heart and soul in a psychedelic peepshow to the forthcoming release of her new album, 'Nomad'.

Exclusive Magazine recently sat down with Rose and discussed the exciting new album, upcoming shows as well as her undying love for Jimi Hendrix and all things rock ‘n roll.

Your music has its roots in classic rock. Who were your musical influences growing up and how many still factor into your music today? "My influences change from time to time, but there are certain musicians and writers that I always come back to. Those same artists have influenced me from the beginning. The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan...if I feel lost or uninspired I always come back to classic rock, folk and blues because it is where I feel most at home."
As an up-and-coming artist, how would you describe the sound and style of your new album 'Nomad'? "I would say that the sound is rooted in classic rock, but branches into folk, alternative, and blues. I don't really like to say it's pop music, but I can't lie, the pop sound is definitely in my blood and it finds its way into my music sometimes."
Although the album isn’t out until 2010, your five-song EP is set for release September 29. How did you decide which songs to put on the EP and how is this release the best representation of your approach to music? "That was a really hard decision for me. Ultimately, I decided that I would treat the EP like an introduction and try to give the listener the best first impression that I could. I chose songs that I felt were easily approachable, if that makes sense. On the other hand, I also chose songs that tell my story a bit because I want people to get to know me through my music more than anything."
You’ve recently returned to your homestate of New York after living several years in Los Angeles to pursue your music career. Tell us a little bit about how this move influenced your writing style - and why you decided to take your life back to New York "A lot of my move back to New York had to do with this sense of completion I felt after finishing Nomad. Well...wait. Maybe that's a lie. I was pretty much ready to move back before we even recorded the album. I just felt like it was time. While L.A. was my homebase, I travelled a lot and never stayed in one place for very long, so coming back to New York was just my way of settling down."
"I feel like I became an adult in L.A., though, because I moved there having no family or friends in that city, so every experience was entirely my own. I initially went there for college and then left to pursue music full time, so I will always love the city of Los Angeles because it solidified my dream. New York has always been my home, though, so the decision to return wasn't a difficult one. In terms of my writing style, I think New York is challenging me, which is thrilling and terrifying at the same time."
Your father is Oscar and Grammy winning composer, Alan Menken. How do you think growing up in a musical household has factored into your talents as an artist? "I think having parents who are artists (my mom is a dancer) allowed me to feel comfortable pursuing music as my career. Frankly, they believed in me when I didn't even believe in myself. My dad, in particular, always took me along to recording sessions when he could. He showed me all the work that goes into making music, which made me love it even more. I feel very lucky to have my parents."
You once got into a physical altercation after an argument over who was the better guitarist, Clapton or Hendrix. You were on Team Hendrix -- tell us a little about this passion of yours for the superstar musician "Hah, yeah that was a funny night. I still can't believe I did that, but it makes for a great story! I think I love Jimi Hendrix so much because I know I will never be able to play like that and his guitar playing just makes my heart feel like it's going to explode. There are whole lives lived in his solos. On a personal level, if I need to forget about my life for a minute, to ease some kind of pain, it will always be Jimi Hendrix that I put on. There's too much to say...I idolize him."
How easy or hard is it to create a new, vibrant, wanted-by-the-public sound that both builds on and surpasses the musical wonderments and accomplishments that preceded it within the industry? "I really can't think about music like that because it feels unnatural. I - Russell Trunk's Exclusive Magazine


"A Rose By Any Other Name..."

Blonde-haired beauty, Anna Rose is not your average 24-year old singer, songwriter, guitarist. Beneath her gentle exterior lies a hard-core rock ‘n roll chick. Born in Manhattan but raised in upstate New York, Rose has channeled her love for classic rock into an organic and paisley printed fabrication. Inspired by the thoughtful and carefree California of the 60’s and 70’s, she sings of light hearted lyrics while strumming along to groovy bohemian beats. With the recent release of her debut self-titled EP, Anna Rose bares her heart and soul in a psychedelic peepshow to the forthcoming release of her new album, 'Nomad'.

Exclusive Magazine recently sat down with Rose and discussed the exciting new album, upcoming shows as well as her undying love for Jimi Hendrix and all things rock ‘n roll.

Your music has its roots in classic rock. Who were your musical influences growing up and how many still factor into your music today? "My influences change from time to time, but there are certain musicians and writers that I always come back to. Those same artists have influenced me from the beginning. The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan...if I feel lost or uninspired I always come back to classic rock, folk and blues because it is where I feel most at home."
As an up-and-coming artist, how would you describe the sound and style of your new album 'Nomad'? "I would say that the sound is rooted in classic rock, but branches into folk, alternative, and blues. I don't really like to say it's pop music, but I can't lie, the pop sound is definitely in my blood and it finds its way into my music sometimes."
Although the album isn’t out until 2010, your five-song EP is set for release September 29. How did you decide which songs to put on the EP and how is this release the best representation of your approach to music? "That was a really hard decision for me. Ultimately, I decided that I would treat the EP like an introduction and try to give the listener the best first impression that I could. I chose songs that I felt were easily approachable, if that makes sense. On the other hand, I also chose songs that tell my story a bit because I want people to get to know me through my music more than anything."
You’ve recently returned to your homestate of New York after living several years in Los Angeles to pursue your music career. Tell us a little bit about how this move influenced your writing style - and why you decided to take your life back to New York "A lot of my move back to New York had to do with this sense of completion I felt after finishing Nomad. Well...wait. Maybe that's a lie. I was pretty much ready to move back before we even recorded the album. I just felt like it was time. While L.A. was my homebase, I travelled a lot and never stayed in one place for very long, so coming back to New York was just my way of settling down."
"I feel like I became an adult in L.A., though, because I moved there having no family or friends in that city, so every experience was entirely my own. I initially went there for college and then left to pursue music full time, so I will always love the city of Los Angeles because it solidified my dream. New York has always been my home, though, so the decision to return wasn't a difficult one. In terms of my writing style, I think New York is challenging me, which is thrilling and terrifying at the same time."
Your father is Oscar and Grammy winning composer, Alan Menken. How do you think growing up in a musical household has factored into your talents as an artist? "I think having parents who are artists (my mom is a dancer) allowed me to feel comfortable pursuing music as my career. Frankly, they believed in me when I didn't even believe in myself. My dad, in particular, always took me along to recording sessions when he could. He showed me all the work that goes into making music, which made me love it even more. I feel very lucky to have my parents."
You once got into a physical altercation after an argument over who was the better guitarist, Clapton or Hendrix. You were on Team Hendrix -- tell us a little about this passion of yours for the superstar musician "Hah, yeah that was a funny night. I still can't believe I did that, but it makes for a great story! I think I love Jimi Hendrix so much because I know I will never be able to play like that and his guitar playing just makes my heart feel like it's going to explode. There are whole lives lived in his solos. On a personal level, if I need to forget about my life for a minute, to ease some kind of pain, it will always be Jimi Hendrix that I put on. There's too much to say...I idolize him."
How easy or hard is it to create a new, vibrant, wanted-by-the-public sound that both builds on and surpasses the musical wonderments and accomplishments that preceded it within the industry? "I really can't think about music like that because it feels unnatural. I - Russell Trunk's Exclusive Magazine


"Getting to Know: Anna Rose"

By Farah Joan Fard November 8, 2009

Innovator and musician Les Paul once said about playing guitar, “It’s not technique — it’s what you have to say”. Judging from her music, guitarist and singer Anna Rose has a lot to say. From everything to music technology, gender gaps in the industry, musical theater and sight reading-she hit the nail on the head. The daughter of a ballet dancer and composer Alan Menken, Anna Rose grew up in an artistic and musical environment. First introduced to the guitar at age 5, she is now wowing audiences with her solid voice and musical skill. Her upcoming debut, ‘Nomad’, was co-produced with William (Billy) Sullivan, and includes five songs from her current EP.

BLAST: I appreciated that in your bio you mention that your musical process includes “full takes, no Auto-Tune, and maybe one synthesizer”. What do you think of the use of technology in music and recording these days?
Anna Rose: You know, I think the use of technology is wonderful, but personally I don’t think I have the experience to put it to its full use. My experience lies in playing guitar and singing and doing things live. The best way to capture what I do is capturing things in full takes…I don’t think there is anything wrong with Auto-tune (but) I choose not to use it in my work…it’s dishonest for me.

BLAST: I like your quote about wearing dresses. It really struck me because as a drummer wearing a dress is not much of an option. Do you feel like there is an assumption of how a female musician should look on stage?
AR: Absolutely. I think that there is still that stigma of female musicians kinda just being the figurehead of a great operation…the puppet. I don’t think that’s the case with every musician…I think every great female artist has fought against it…I fight against it all the time. Keith Richards can get up in a T-shirt and jeans…if a girl does that it’s like she didn’t get dressed up for the occasion.

BLAST: That being said, do you feel there is a divide between men and women in the field of rock and music? Or does bringing it up create that divide?
AR: You know, I work well with male musicians, my band is all guys. Personally, I’ve found I end up working with male musicians. That being said I know of brilliant female musicians I would love to work with. Good music is good music. The important thing is to let your music be the most important part of it. That’s what bridges the gap. It’s important for music to just be music, and not just an industry of people trying to be cool.

BLAST: So you started on piano. Do you read music or do you feel you learn and write more by ear?
AR: I don’t read music, I read tablature for guitar, but I really do everything by ear primarily. I don’t want to advocate people not learning music, it’s important for certain paths….my particular path as a writer doesn’t necessarily require that.

BLAST: A lot of guitarists strive on soloing. (The solo on Picture is awesome—reminds me of Voodoo Child Slight Return there) What do you think about that? Is there too much of a focus on soloing in the guitar world?
AR: Well, first, that solo isn’t me…that solo is my lead guitarist, Adam Stoler, he’s my musical director for my band. My whole band is comprised of some (great) musicians…but I’m a rhythm player through and through. I think soloing is important …it’s a different animal than playing rhythm guitar. You’re kind of born to be a solo player or a rhythm player…it’s just never been my thing. But I envision for sure.

BLAST: Ok, random question. Are there any guitar riffs you’d rather not hear again?
AR: I can’t think of any off the top of my head! That’s an awesome question! I hate guitar riffs with a lot of chorus on them or chamber…anything ‘chorusy’ or ethereal…unless it’s meant for a certain sound effect. Oh! The theme from the original Beverly Hills 90210…but I also obsessively watch it. Maybe that’s my own fault.

BLAST: In another interview you stated that though you idolize a lot of artists from the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ’70s that you listen to, and recording one of their songs would be blasphemous in a way. What do you think of all the remakes of Beatles songs and the all the things like Rockband & even the film Across the Universe, which take from these artists?
AR: Across the Universe was really well done…with unique takes (on those songs). Covering someone else’s song, when it’s your own take on it….is homage to that artist. When you’re redoing a song that was made famous by Johnny Cash or something…you need to have your own unique stance on it. Personally I think I’m too young and early in my career to have the right to do that. I need to explore my own creativity and have a couple of pieces of my own work out there before I can say I am good enough to cover someone’s song. I have too much respect of that work to even go near it, though I do cover things live but I won’t record them

BLAST: Your father has written many pieces for film a - Blast Magazine


"What You Need To Know About Anna Rose"

What are you doing Wednesday, October 14th? Well, Black Panda PR is hosting a CMJ showcase at Webster Hall, and it’s going to be an awesome chance to rock out to killer music and hang out with rad bands. Gypsy Warrior was given the opportunity to style one of the artists, Anna Rose, for the show! While in the midst of standing barefoot in the GW studio, changing from blouse to black dress, I was able to do a quick Q&A with her! For a tiny 5’0″ blonde babe, she has a super bubbly personality – within the first couple minutes I could already tell that this enthusiastic Aries would be amazing!

Anna Rose was born in Hells Kitchen, New York City – after a few short years she moved with her parents to Upstate New York. By the time she was age 18, she ventured to Los Angeles to attend Occidental College. After 2.5 years of studying a mix of Dance, Choreography, and English, she left to put her music career in full swing. Now, Anna Rose lives in the East Village with her King Charles Cavalier Spaniel, Joplin and has been touring around the country playing her own music and loving every second of it!

Who are your biggest music influences? Do they ever change?

Oh wow, I generally love all music and my influences change a lot depending on what mood I’m in or what song I’m working on. However, I always come back to a few iconic artists: Led Zeppelin and the Beatles for sure! And of course: Jimi Hendrix, Fleetwood Mac, Rolling Stones, and The Doors.

I have a Spotify inspo playlist that I’m updating constantly – right now I’m on my third playlist and regularly listen to: The Stooges, Black Lips and Son House, which is an amazing blues artist that you should definitely check out!



If you could pick your top three cities where you performed, which were your favorite? Why?

That’s a tough one. For me it’s all about how the room sounds, the people who are there to support to me, and everyone who enjoys the music I’m putting out. If I had to think back to my favorite venues, they would be:

1. Seven Steps Up in Spring Lake, Michigan

2. Jammin Java in Vienna, Virginia

3. Sellersville Theatre in Sellersville, Pennsylvania


As of right now, if you could play 3 songs on repeat what would they be?

1. “Pretty Pimpin” – Kurt Vile

2. “Rhiannon” – Fleetwood Mac

3. “I Wanna Be Your Dog” – Stooges



What is your spirit animal and why?

Oh jeeze. Can I choose a couple? I think I’m a mix of a few animals:

Horse – They are wild and untamable – like me!

Bear – They are super protective.

Snake – I know that might sound seedy, but they are very mysterious creatures, plus they shed their own skin and that’s how I like to look at myself when it comes to being an artist. They become something new and fresh, and that’s how I want my music to sound.


So, it’s the first day of fall, what are you wearing?

Oh that’s easy! A white V-neck tee (V-neck is a must) with black high waisted jeans, heeled booties – today she brought her favorite pair from Dolce Vita – topped with a black leather jacket. Oh, and decked out in rings and necklaces of course!



It’s a Friday night, and you’re going out with a group of friends to a local bar: what is your drink of choice?

Jack and coke – I don’t know why, but at every venue people would hand me a Jack and Coke, so I’ve gotten used to ordering them when I’m out. Plus, the sugar is a good boost for me before I go on stage!



This question was a Gypsy Warrior office favorite: If you were a witch, which witch would you be?

Stevie Nicks! She’s like the role model of all witches! [and we totally agree!] - Gypsy Warrior


"10 Questions With Alan and Anna Rose Menken"

10 Questions With Alan and Anna Rose Menken
Discover the musical ties that bond this talented father and daughter

Posted in MusicWorld on May 22, 2013 by M. Sean Ryan

“There is nothing more awkward than going to a karaoke bar and hearing drunk chicks sing ‘A Whole New World,’” Anna Rose Menken reveals, referring to her father’s megahit from Aladdin, on a crisp evening late in March. Cutting gamely through the din of a hotel bar in Manhattan’s Union Square, the 28-year-old singer-songwriter, who performs under simply “Anna Rose,” explains the paradox of being so close to some of the most instantly recognizable songs to enter the American songbook since the late 1980s — the evergreens her father, Alan Menken, helped plant into the popular consciousness as arguably the most essential composer in the Disney canon —and yet having so few, if any, points of reference in common with the generations that grew up internalizing her father’s songs.

A few days later, taking a call from his home upstate, Mr. Menken couldn’t sound more empathetic — as a parent, but also, more deeply, as a fellow composer. In separate conversations both father and daughter discuss how they differ, as well as the common threads that tie them to the BMI family.

1. What is your earliest musical memory?

Anna: From what my parents say, I was singing right away. Music was always around me, in general. I really started to attach myself to classic rock, in particular to the Beatles, and then my dad introduced me to Joni Mitchell. I really wanted to play what I was hearing. I remember being able to mimic Barbra Streisand, or Joni Mitchell’s voice — you sort of learn as a singer by mimicking.

But I had something that I wanted to say, and even at that age I remember it just felt good to put my hands on a guitar. I started playing guitar when I was five. At that point, I started getting into guitar rock. The first thing for me – it was Jimi Hendrix. He’s so daunting to me. He’s this pinnacle of innovation; he changed rock and roll. I’m in awe — still. I don’t try to understand it. I just love it.

Alan: My sister and I would make up musicals in the backseat of the car. But of course that all went out the window when the Beatles came along, the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan. But, somehow, remembering those musicals — “Guys and Dolls,” “My Fair Lady,” the early Bock and Harnick shows, “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” — all that stuff stuck with me in a very big way.

2. These days your two mediums may sound a bit polarized to some, with Alan working in musicals and considering the rock-edge of Anna’s upcoming album Behold A Pale Horse. When, or how, did your early musical tastes come to shape your current craft?

Alan: Before college, I was writing songs to further my dream of being the next Bob Dylan. A lot of guitar songs — I was composing on piano before that. But while I was in college and had hair down my back and was a wild-eyed hippie, I was still writing musicals at NYU. My sister was in the Hall of Fame Players, so I was commissioned to write a musical. I always kept my hands in that.

Anna: While I write music that’s very different than Disney music, or musical theatre, everyone from Disney really nurtured me. I wouldn’t be playing hard rock right now if it wasn’t for them, in some respect, because I knew I didn’t want to go in that direction — and I didn’t let anyone put me in that direction. You should’ve seen a producer try to put me in a dress one time!

I relate more, and I admire more, that image of the male rock star. It’s not something I fully understand yet. I will watch concert films and footage over and over, and there are female performers I hold dear. Chrissie Hynde and Joan Jett: Those are some fearless women. I love Stevie Nicks. I think it was the fearlessness of a male front man — you watch Mick Jagger, Jimi, Jim Morrison: They’re completely within the music. There’s no discomfort about their bodies. It took me working through those male idols to realize what I wanted as a female. I want to get to that point where I’m so free and comfortable and within the music that it doesn’t matter: There’s a lot of sexiness in rock and roll, but I don’t believe that that sexiness is male or female.

3. Where do you prefer to play or see music? What’s your favorite venue

Anna: I love the Bowery Electric; it’s a great size — the basement area. I’ve always loved playing Rockwood Music Hall. You could have five people in that room and feel like the king of the world because it’s small but it’s also a great place to hone your skills. It’s a room where people really want to hear music. In LA: Hotel Café. That venue is awesome. Great sound.

Alan: I don’t know the clubs very well. I don’t go to the theater all that much. I’m a Tony voter, so I go when I’ll be voting or to see a friend’s work. I go as a support. My experience is pretty much limited to seeing Anna and her band, or [my other daughter] Nora when she’s performing. There’s a whole generation of kids — now young adults — who I feel an investment in, particularly because they feel an investment in me. And I do love young people. I love the passion about the arts and creativity. It’s irresistible to be around that.

4. Is there anything you look for in a new project, or for inspiration?

Alan: For me a lot of it is relationship based; that’s the main way I choose projects. But also that the music takes you someplace; if it doesn’t do that then it’s wasting the medium, as far as I’m concerned. Every musical I take on has to suggest some kind of a world that can be expressed in music, stylistically — an era, a sensibility. That world really should be ground that isn’t overworked, or overexposed. Coming up with the music for Sister Act was great because it was fresh.

I do look for a storyline that has the right sort of bone structure to it. You need a certain kind of character or structure so the story can be told through a variety of songs that move the story forward. It’s got to have an emotional contour to it for the songs to really soar.

Anna: I’m kind of a people-watcher. Whenever I get stuck, I read a lot of articles. I talk about Kurt Cobain in that way, because he wrote “Polly” about a serial killer in Seattle; he started pulling from places like that, and I find I do that sometimes as well. When it’s so uncomfortable to be in my own head, I’ll write for a character. In that way I’m very similar to my dad.

5. What do you prioritize when writing or recording?

Alan: What I generally do is work out an entire structure for a musical before I write a note of anything: “What is the story? Where are the song moments? How does the score move forward?” And doing that, not alone, but with some lyricists, probably with the book writer, sometimes the director. It’s a very collaborative medium. I like the sense that the person who’s going to write the words is right there in the trenches with me in terms of the conception. Then we write a song and see if it works.

Making sure it’s got the stylistic stance I need it to is enough. I have a number of orchestrators who are my guys, who I go to. So I create blueprints, essentially. I’ll work in MIDI and send a MIDI file to an arranger; it could be an internal arranger, a vocal arranger or an orchestrator, and I pass what I do to them. With a film score I’ll do maybe two or three piano reductions that I’ll give to an orchestrator. I know a lot of shortcuts I do as a writer to get a song demoed — those are not shortcuts Anna finds acceptable, which is great. I’m sort of an architect. Anna is an architect and also someone who inhabits what she creates, lives with it, redesigns it, takes it out there and shows it. It’s a different relationship to the work.

Anna: The thing we differ on is effects vs. rawness. One of the things I love about Son House is you can hear his hand hit the guitar, the slap on the strings; you can almost hear the roughness of his fingers, him spitting on the microphone. I love that. As a songwriter I love that, being able to hear the little nuances of the songwriter doing their song.

My dad loves — I don’t want to say perfection — but he loves that ease and smoothness of pop music. I have an appreciation for it. I just don’t make that kind of music. As a songwriter I know that I will probably at one point start writing for other people. I know I can write pop music. But in terms of me as a performer, I draw the line at that. I don’t want to make things slick like that; it feels like a lie to me. I like to say, if I’m doing a scratch vocal we’re using it as a real take. I always record live.

6. Why did you choose BMI?

Alan: Prior to my association with BMI, I was a conspicuously underachieving composer, premed at NYU. I didn’t really want to pursue music in any sort of an academic way; I didn’t have the interest and, frankly, the aptitude. I would go to the piano practice room and fill notebooks with songs; it’s what I felt compelled to do.

My parents said, “Look, you’re not going to go to medical school. You’re not going to go to graduate school. At least look into this workshop, because it could help.” And I joined the musical theatre workshop with a wonderful teacher named Lehman Engel, who BMI had brought in to work with accomplished songwriters, but people who were not accomplished in writing for theater. That led to starting the class with a lot of younger writers coming in, and that, of course, became this whole tradition that’s spread all over the country. There are workshops like it, but frankly BMI was the pioneer. And BMI was my family. The workshop was my family… and of course it changed my life — in ways I never expected.

Anna: Well! I am a legacy [laughs]. BMI did very, very right by my dad. They really helped him as a songwriter, and I think they’ve proven that with me. They’ve really paid attention to my growth as a songwriter, and I know that it has nothing to do with my dad — that it’s because I am a songwriter, just like the rest of the people that they represent. [BMI has] given me performance opportunities, critiques and valuable opinions. It’s sort of the family business, I guess, but I’m not disappointed with that. I’m very happy with the family business.

7. How valuable has cowriting been to you as a writer?

Alan: Writing on your own, which many of us do, can be wonderful, and yet, to be honest, really, really hard. Collaboration has been one of the most important things that has sustained my career. A song with Howard Ashman is different than a song with Tim Rice…. they’re all different flavors and personalities. Part of it can be a reflection of a relationship, as well as a statement, because it’s two sensibilities coming together about a sentiment they feel strongly about.

Anna: If I sit down with another songwriter I will always find a connection with them. I really enjoy it. I was anti-cowriting for a number of years: “That’s giving up. Blah blah.” When I’m writing on my own, until I know where I want the song to go — meaning with words — then it’s hard for me to finish it. The melody somehow follows the meaning. In that way, I think I write very differently from my dad.

8. What’s your advice to fellow songwriters?

Alan: Certainly hanging around the people who do it is kind of essential if you want to have a rich, strong career. You could have an album of the eight songs you’ve written in your life and that’s it, but music is a very interactive form. It elicits an immediate emotional reaction of some kind and, at its best, you create something addictive that people will want to keep going back to.

Songs have the ability to wildly exceed the goals you set for yourself depending on what you come up with. And sometimes they don’t. You set the bar for yourself as high as you possibly can, and be willing to throw things out — a lot.

Anna: I loved recording and writing the songs for Nomad. But I think with any songwriter, your first album is a compilation of all the stuff you’ve written since whenever you started writing. Performing songs that you wrote between 12- and 18-years-old, not having it come out for years, you’re emotionally beyond that.

So I feel like with Behold A Pale Horse I have caught up. This record is kind of my arrival at a sound that I love, where I’m comfortable and excited to be: I’m not a female rocker. I’m not a male rocker. I don’t write for musical theatre. I don’t have to subscribe, and being comfortable with the fact that I don’t subscribe to anyone else’s category opened it up. Now I’m so ready to write the next record.

9. Were you ever reluctant to critique each other’s music?

Anna: Once he started letting me into the process, no. I have an incredible amount of respect for my dad; he’s been a great dad. So I never want to offend him, and at the same time, the door was always open for me to analyze or criticize or question, because I felt like I was being taught to question.

When I was in middle school and taking the guitar seriously, writing my first songs and recording demos, I was really focused. And my dad would take me out of school to LA with him to listen to him record with these huge orchestras. I would get to sit in the control room. That was my educational trip, and for him to notice I really had a passion for this and to allow it to be that way is so incredible. I would be much more naïve, my aspirations would probably be a lot more grandiose if I hadn’t seen the reality of a lot of that work, if he hadn’t let me start singing demos for him. He let me see what it was really going to be like.

Alan: I’m very afraid of pushing my sensibilities onto Anna, and I know there are a lot of pressures that weigh on her. Anytime I open my mouth I’ve got to be very careful that I’m not sending the wrong signal, because the truth is Anna’s career is all about Anna. I love the fact that she feels a connection to me in her career, but I look at her career and see even more than she does that it’s entirely something she’s created and is being won by the strength of her personality and passion.

I do like to be an example. The fact that I’m still actively writing shows is a great example, because art is not an end; art is a life. It’s a process. You live it. I’m very proud of the fact that she’s at a place where it’s in your guts. You have to create like you have to breathe.

10. What have you learned from one another as musicians?

Anna: I’m not playing in a popular genre, and that being said I don’t mind the hard work. My dad works harder than anyone I know. It was not easy for him for fifteen years. He wrote jingles — like, roach-killer jingles — played for ballet classes, whatever. He works his ass off, and worked his ass off to get there. For me, if I didn’t work my ass of, I’d feel like I didn’t deserve it. So I’m down for the struggle.

Alan: So much of Anna’s persona is the performer that I did not become. In a way, maybe on some level she’s fulfilling some dream I never fulfilled. I do perform, but not like Anna, not at the level she performs, and I think that’s fabulous. There’s a connection and yet there’s a completely separate root system that’s growing in its own direction. It’s been a challenge and it’s been a joy, because I’ve seen her develop her own voice and style. You get scared when you watch your children try to walk, and then one day they’re walking and you go, ‘Oh, my God! She’s doing it.’ You can take no credit for that, except that hopefully you gave them the emotional support they needed to get on their feet.

SOURCEMusicWorld - BMI Music World


"Anna Rose Brings The Best Kind Of Blues To The Studio At Webster Hall"

I had not been to a great blues or rock ‘n’ roll show in a while. A show that captivated me from start to finish, and made me want to go home and continue listening to the music I heard that evening. On Thursday night, April 16, I finally had that highly anticipated experience, once again, and it felt great. If you haven’t yet seen a show at the Studio at Webster Hall, you really should. It’s an excellent little venue with great sound quality. What I love about these types of venues is that it allows for a certain amount of intimacy between the performer and the audience. Castle Creek, Anna Rose and Tony Lucca graced that stage with the utmost energy, and it was greatly appreciated by all of us in the crowd. As someone who thoroughly enjoys live music, the whole evening was a treat.



Castle Creek opened the show with their stellar acoustic set. Kim Monroe and Chris Eves are an extremely harmonically sound duo with rich melodies and a bluesy swag to top it off. They managed to hold down their delightfully syncopated rhythms with just their guitars, but it’s always nice to have a little percussion backup. With the help of their Cajon player, Jeff Bianchi, Castle Creek did a wonderful job warming up the audience. They opened up with “Burning Bridges,” which is a bluesy rock tune with a bit of a down-home vibe. Kim’s vocals carried the song with her range and vibrato, and her harmonies with Chris were spot on. The song really set the tone for a night of good music. A few highlights from their set included some of Chris’ guitar solos. It’s fun to watch someone completely shred on the acoustic guitar. Not only were his solos, clean and catchy, but they also had such an old school blues style to them. Another highlight was their cover of “Burning Down The House” by the Talking Heads. They made it their own, yet managed to create the feeling that I had temporarily been taken back in time.



Up next was Anna Rose, whose small stature is utterly deceiving. This girl is a firecracker, and an absolute joy to watch. I was already a fan of Anna’s album Behold A Pale Horse before the show, but she surprised me in the best way possible with her set. Accompanied on stage by Adam Stoler, these two brought Anna’s album to life, playing it how it’s really supposed to be heard. Opening with “Beautiful World” was a perfect way to begin. I was astounded at her vocal ability from the few seconds she opened her mouth. What a powerhouse! You can tell Anna has a big voice just from listening to the album, but her true tonal quality was clear as day, as she sang that song for us. When Adam joined in for harmonies, it was obvious that these two have great musical chemistry. Adam reeled in the crowd with his electrifying and intriguing guitar playing. Anna describes “Beautiful World” as being the most pop driven of her songs, so it was a great way to invite the audience into the experience before kicking into high gear with some epic blues tunes.
Anna was only beginning to show us all why she deserves our attention as they began playing this strong and timeless, bluesy guitar riff. That riff took me back to the days of B.B. King and Cream, with a slight funk edge. I was rocking along to the riff when Anna started to sing. The verse was captivating, as she toyed with her lower vocal range. Anna proves she is not to be messed with her badass lyrics “I ain’t got no trouble now. I ain’t got no million dollar smile.” She declares herself the “pint size electric child,” as that powerful riff reintroduces itself. You could see her spirit and her pride coming through with every strum on her guitar and every belt of a high note. For me, her voice was reminiscent of the range and passion of Heart’s lead singer, Ann Wilson. In fact, I would love to see Anna cover a Heart song. Her tone kept me wanting to hear more and more. You know that feeling of being so drawn into the music, that it brings you to another place? Well, Anna Rose, thank you for that experience.

Anna kept everyone smiling and captivated as her set went on. She graciously informed the crowd; “It’s National High Five Day. Just let that marinate for a second.” Her charisma was apparent, and her sense of humor propelled the audience to support her even further. She then slowed it back down with “Swan Song,” which only kept proving what a great songwriter she is. She kept the rock vibe alive, while mixing up the set and keeping things interesting. Anna and Adam then performed a cover of “Manic Depression” by Jimi Hendrix, with Adam saying to the crowd: “you asked for it” as he began to deliver some really excellent guitar playing. That old soul sound reverberated through the walls of the studio, and Adams guitar playing, along with Anna’s voice, could place them at Woodstock in 1969. They continued to impress with one of my favorite songs from the album, “Los Angeles.” That song completely came to life on stage. Watching Anna play slide guitar elevated her coolness even more. She allowed her voice to soar with vocal riffs I have never heard before. She was perfectly on pitch and was hitting very high notes with such clarity and beauty. Her voice seemed absolutely limitless, and her passion was obvious. I was stunned at her talent, and that was the moment when I declared Anna Rose to have one of my favorite voices I have ever heard live. It was a thing of art, and a thing to be proud of. There wasn’t just one moment of glory either; there were several. Anna finished the set by bringing out The Rollaways, Stephen Bentz and Mic Capdevielle, to join on bass and drums for the performance of “Because Your Mine.” Anna really loves the full band vibe, and she was able to end her incredible set with a bang! The energy on stage was electric between all of them. The audience was really rocking out at this point, and rightfully so.



I was lucky enough to have the chance to interview Anna Rose, and she is a complete sweetheart with a lot of character and grace. She is the kind of girl you want to have a drink with, or seven. Anna spoke about Behold A Pale Horse being a real concept album for her, and it’s something she is extremely proud of. She said to herself; “Let’s say this is the last record you ever get to make, what would your legacy be that you leave behind?” She used that motivation to create the album, and share her music with the world. Anna says that her favorite part of music is “people will hear things in songs that I never thought they would hear;” that listeners can take a theme of a song and it will hit home for them in a totally different way than she imagined. She talks about playing live and that she believes it’s easier for the audience to see where she’s coming from as an artist. When she plays live she “gets to live ten lives on stage in one show.” It drives her passion to perform, knowing that she has to do everything she can to put on a great show. Anna says, “There’s no way to do it over. There’s no way to go back and change someone’s mind. You have one moment to impress people and to make them understand who you are.” She addressed her Napoleon complex due to her smaller stature, but when she performs, she “just wants to be heard!”



Anna grew up in a musical family, and has been surrounded by incredible influences her whole life. She recalled listening to lots of rock ‘n’ roll music from when she was very young, and later on, falling into the blues when she was learning guitar. One influence I was curious about was her father, Alan Menken. The award winning composer made sure that his daughter was adequately exposed to music from a young age. Her association with her father used to bother her because she didn’t feel like she had enough of her own music out yet to define herself as an artist. She didn’t want to be known only as “Alan Menken’s daughter.” Since the release of Behold A Pale Horse, that changed for her because she felt like she had proven herself as an artist in her own right. She says, “it was very hard for me to reconcile being his daughter when I didn’t know who or what I could become in this industry,” and she didn’t yet “feel worthy of the comparison.” Now, she feels like she is worthy of that comparison and has a lot to be proud of. They make entirely different music, and now she can fully appreciate that. Anna values having not only one, but two parents who understand everything you go through in the entertainment industry. She respects her father’s work, and is extremely proud of him. Anna and I continued to talk about the relationships she holds with her musical companions, and she spoke about Adam as being “like a brother” to her. We both agreed that you have to surround yourself with good people who fuel your creativity. She spoke of how much she enjoys touring with Tony Lucca and the music he makes. Tony, the headliner of the evening, took the stage next after Anna.

Tony Lucca took the stage for over two hours, and brought an immense amount of energy and talent to the Studio at Webster Hall. He continued the trend of the bluesy rock vibe of the night. Tony and his band also threw some funk tunes our way, which helped keep the party vibrant and alive for the duration of the evening. A personal favorite moment of his set was when he played “Hear Ya Say” from his 2013 EP, With the Whole World Watching. The song provided an epic call and response moment as Tony sang the chorus through his lyric “I hear ya say,” in which the audience sang back; “holla, holla!” Even if you didn’t know the song before, it was so catchy and fun, that you learned it quickly and were able to jump in with everyone else. It was a powerful rock concert moment, and it speaks to Tony and his band’s charisma and energy that they had the crowd roaring like that. Tony’s songs showed off his skillful vocal talents, his multi-instrumental playing, as well as his ability as a performer to entertain for over two hours. His set had many components including his guitarist, Keaton Simons, playing and singing one of his own tracks, “Masterpiece,” with the whole band. Keaton invited Michael Ghegan on stage to accompany the band with the soprano and tenor saxophones. Keaton’s smooth, funky soul song was a cool deviation from the rest of the set. Tony also brought Anna Rose back on stage for a duet of “Right On Time.” Seeing those two extreme talents collaborating on stage was a beautiful thing.
It was an epic night of blues and rock ‘n’ roll music from all three artists. As the night went on, the party went on. Anna Rose will be on tour with Tony Lucca through the beginning of May. If you have a chance to catch a show, I’d highly recommend you do so. Anna said that as the performer, “you’re adding to the party. You’re the DJ, but you’ve written all of the music.” If these guys are the DJ’s, I’m always down for a party! - Pancakes and Whiskey


"Anna Rose and Lee Dewyze on StageOne TOMORROW (Wed. April 8)"

The daughter of Oscar-winning Alan Menken, know for his musical compositions in films such as The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast, claims she is a Rock ‘N’ Roll child. After learning how to play the piano at 2-years-old and taking up guitar at the age of 5, Rose gravitated to the greats; The Rolling Stones, Janis Joplin, Muddy Waters and Buddy Guy. “My house was a Rock ‘N’ Roll house,” said Rose. But how do you label an artist with such diverse rock roots? Rose described her music as “70’s Aerosmith – where Steven Tyler is sweating on stage. It’s Strut-Rock mixed with accidental Pop and front Porch Blues,” or as Waters would say:

Well, my mother told my father,
Just before hmmm, I was born,
“I got a boy child’s comin,
He’s gonna be, he’s gonna be a rollin stone,
Sure ‘nough, he’s a rollin stone
Sure ‘nough, he’s a rollin stone”
(“Rollin’ Stone” by Muddy Waters)

Except, that boy is no match for Anna Rose – where the road is home and true spirit of Rock ‘N’ Roll becomes synonymous with ‘Beat Culture’ of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road.” In the past two years Rose has proved herself as a Rock singer/songwriter. The 27 year-old has strong beliefs in the importance of live music. Touring has allowed Rose to feel – connecting with her fans on multiple platfiorms. “I always feel that music is extremely individual and during live performances my records are more Rock ‘N’ Roll because I am less introverted, opposed to being in the studio,” said Rose. As Rose heads for Fairfield Theatre Company with her electric guitarist she will bring the energy of a full band, but be able to strip it down, “just like it used to be when I started performing solo. It will be interesting to connect with fans with just my guitar and vocals,” said Rose.

Anna Rose Music Digest:

The independent artist and soon-to-be-married rocker is a living reminder that, at the end of the day, music is what keeps us going. “On tour is the only place where you can connect with fans and the band. Digestion of music has become so rapid – put on Shazam and it tells you who the artist is. Being on the road is my favorite time to listen to music because the drummer (guitarist, etc) is going to hear things different than you and it pulls you in – and connects you.” Her latest work “Behold A Pale Horse” is electric and gritty in “Electric Child,” driving in “Because You’re Mine” and “Show Me Your Hands;” but still sexual, intimate and soulful, heard in “Beautiful World”. “The goal is to make what I want to make,” said Rose. For the next record Rose will continue down the same path – Rock ‘N’ Roll, gritty blues, trippy placebo, and still avoid recording crutches like auto-tune. “ I’m still pondering. The writing process has been good [although not all the songs have been written]. I have been holding off until these upcoming shows, but the next record will be full of great pop songs and heavy rock.”

Final thoughts – “The first week I’m touring with Lee Dewyze; excited to meet him and see what he is all about, but moreover I get to talk, listen and perform music all day,” said Rose. “So come out and see Lee an I, but if not, go out and see live music – do something else! But really by that I mean – come see Lee and I (laughs). - Fairfield Mirror (written by Charles DeFilippo)


"CMJ 2015 Week in Review"

Last of the night was the beautiful and captivating Anna Rose, who's bluesy vocals recall some of the very rock and roll icons she idolizes—legends like Janis Joplin, Chrissie Hynde and Joan Jett and even a little bit of contemporary powerhouse Elle King. Check out her latest release, "My Body Is A Cage" and listen to that range. CHILLS. - Music Is My Kingsize Bed


"CMJ Black Panda PR Showcase at Webster Hall"

Last, but certainly not least, Anna Rose hit the stage. I was already a big fan of hers, as this was the second time I had seen her perform. She blew me away the first time in an acoustic set, and now, with a full band, she was ready to rock, and that is exactly what she did. Anna Rose’s vocal talents far exceed anything I could describe. One of my favorite songs from the set was “Electric Child.” She truly is the “electric child,” and her riff heavy jams permeated the walls of Webster Hall. Her charisma makes her even more exciting to watch. I loved her new track, “Shit’s Fucked Up.” Her bluesy croon brings me back to the days of Heart and Janis Joplin. She perfectly melds rock ‘n’ roll with classic blues. This girl is a complete badass. Her vocal growl is wildly soulful, and when she played “Because You’re Mine,” my mouth dropped at least five times as her talent is truly a joy to experience. Closing the night with “Los Angeles” allowed this firecracker to go out with a bang. The night came to an end, and Black Panda PR proved to have quite the impressive roster and to throw a pretty great party. - Pancakes and Whiskey


"Anna Rose Brings the Best Kind of Blues to the Studio at Webster Hall"

I had not been to a great blues or rock ‘n’ roll show in a while. A show that captivated me from start to finish, and made me want to go home and continue listening to the music I heard that evening. On Thursday night, April 16, I finally had that highly anticipated experience, once again, and it felt great. If you haven’t yet seen a show at the Studio at Webster Hall, you really should. It’s an excellent little venue with great sound quality. What I love about these types of venues is that it allows for a certain amount of intimacy between the performer and the audience. Castle Creek, Anna Rose and Tony Lucca graced that stage with the utmost energy, and it was greatly appreciated by all of us in the crowd. As someone who thoroughly enjoys live music, the whole evening was a treat.
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Up next was Anna Rose, whose small stature is utterly deceiving. This girl is a firecracker, and an absolute joy to watch. I was already a fan of Anna’s album Behold A Pale Horse before the show, but she surprised me in the best way possible with her set. Accompanied on stage by Adam Stoler, these two brought Anna’s album to life, playing it how it’s really supposed to be heard. Opening with “Beautiful World” was a perfect way to begin. I was astounded at her vocal ability from the few seconds she opened her mouth. What a powerhouse! You can tell Anna has a big voice just from listening to the album, but her true tonal quality was clear as day, as she sang that song for us. When Adam joined in for harmonies, it was obvious that these two have great musical chemistry. Adam reeled in the crowd with his electrifying and intriguing guitar playing. Anna describes “Beautiful World” as being the most pop driven of her songs, so it was a great way to invite the audience into the experience before kicking into high gear with some epic blues tunes.

Anna was only beginning to show us all why she deserves our attention as they began playing this strong and timeless, bluesy guitar riff. That riff took me back to the days of B.B. King and Cream, with a slight funk edge. I was rocking along to the riff when Anna started to sing. The verse was captivating, as she toyed with her lower vocal range. Anna proves she is not to be messed with her badass lyrics “I ain’t got no trouble now. I ain’t got no million dollar smile.” She declares herself the “pint size electric child,” as that powerful riff reintroduces itself. You could see her spirit and her pride coming through with every strum on her guitar and every belt of a high note. For me, her voice was reminiscent of the range and passion of Heart’s lead singer, Ann Wilson. In fact, I would love to see Anna cover a Heart song. Her tone kept me wanting to hear more and more. You know that feeling of being so drawn into the music, that it brings you to another place? Well, Anna Rose, thank you for that experience.

Anna kept everyone smiling and captivated as her set went on. She graciously informed the crowd; “It’s National High Five Day. Just let that marinate for a second.” Her charisma was apparent, and her sense of humor propelled the audience to support her even further. She then slowed it back down with “Swan Song,” which only kept proving what a great songwriter she is. She kept the rock vibe alive, while mixing up the set and keeping things interesting. Anna and Adam then performed a cover of “Manic Depression” by Jimi Hendrix, with Adam saying to the crowd: “you asked for it” as he began to deliver some really excellent guitar playing. That old soul sound reverberated through the walls of the studio, and Adams guitar playing, along with Anna’s voice, could place them at Woodstock in 1969. They continued to impress with one of my favorite songs from the album, “Los Angeles.” That song completely came to life on stage. Watching Anna play slide guitar elevated her coolness even more. She allowed her voice to soar with vocal riffs I have never heard before. She was perfectly on pitch and was hitting very high notes with such clarity and beauty. Her voice seemed absolutely limitless, and her passion was obvious. I was stunned at her talent, and that was the moment when I declared Anna Rose to have one of my favorite voices I have ever heard live. It was a thing of art, and a thing to be proud of. There wasn’t just one moment of glory either; there were several. Anna finished the set by bringing out The Rollaways, Stephen Bentz and Mic Capdevielle, to join on bass and drums for the performance of “Because Your Mine.” Anna really loves the full band vibe, and she was able to end her incredible set with a bang! The energy on stage was electric between all of them. The audience was really rocking out at this point, and rightfully so.

I was lucky enough to have the chance to interview Anna Rose, and she is a complete sweetheart with a lot of character and grace. She is the kind of girl you want to have a drink with, or seven. Anna spoke about Behold A Pale Horse being a real concept album for her, and it’s something she is extremely proud of. She said to herself; “Let’s say this is the last record you ever get to make, what would your legacy be that you leave behind?” She used that motivation to create the album, and share her music with the world. Anna says that her favorite part of music is “people will hear things in songs that I never thought they would hear;” that listeners can take a theme of a song and it will hit home for them in a totally different way than she imagined. She talks about playing live and that she believes it’s easier for the audience to see where she’s coming from as an artist. When she plays live she “gets to live ten lives on stage in one show.” It drives her passion to perform, knowing that she has to do everything she can to put on a great show. Anna says, “There’s no way to do it over. There’s no way to go back and change someone’s mind. You have one moment to impress people and to make them understand who you are.” She addressed her Napoleon complex due to her smaller stature, but when she performs, she “just wants to be heard!”

Anna grew up in a musical family, and has been surrounded by incredible influences her whole life. She recalled listening to lots of rock ‘n’ roll music from when she was very young, and later on, falling into the blues when she was learning guitar. One influence I was curious about was her father, Alan Menken. The award winning composer made sure that his daughter was adequately exposed to music from a young age. Her association with her father used to bother her because she didn’t feel like she had enough of her own music out yet to define herself as an artist. She didn’t want to be known only as “Alan Menken’s daughter.” Since the release of Behold A Pale Horse, that changed for her because she felt like she had proven herself as an artist in her own right. She says, “it was very hard for me to reconcile being his daughter when I didn’t know who or what I could become in this industry,” and she didn’t yet “feel worthy of the comparison.” Now, she feels like she is worthy of that comparison and has a lot to be proud of. They make entirely different music, and now she can fully appreciate that. Anna values having not only one, but two parents who understand everything you go through in the entertainment industry. She respects her father’s work, and is extremely proud of him. Anna and I continued to talk about the relationships she holds with her musical companions, and she spoke about Adam as being “like a brother” to her. We both agreed that you have to surround yourself with good people who fuel your creativity. She spoke of how much she enjoys touring with Tony Lucca and the music he makes. Tony, the headliner of the evening, took the stage next after Anna.

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It was an epic night of blues and rock ‘n’ roll music. As the night went on, the party went on. Anna Rose will be on tour with Tony Lucca through the beginning of May. If you have a chance to catch a show, I’d highly recommend you do so. Anna said that as the performer, “you’re adding to the party. You’re the DJ, but you’ve written all of the music.” If these guys are the DJ’s, I’m always down for a party! - Pancakes and Whiskey


"Anna Rose and Lee Dewyze on StageOne Tomorrow (Wed. April 8)"

The daughter of Oscar-winning Alan Menken, know for his musical compositions in films such as The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast, claims she is a Rock ‘N’ Roll child. After learning how to play the piano at 2-years-old and taking up guitar at the age of 5, Rose gravitated to the greats; The Rolling Stones, Janis Joplin, Muddy Waters and Buddy Guy. “My house was a Rock ‘N’ Roll house,” said Rose. But how do you label an artist with such diverse rock roots? Rose described her music as “70’s Aerosmith – where Steven Tyler is sweating on stage. It’s Strut-Rock mixed with accidental Pop and front Porch Blues,” or as Waters would say:

Well, my mother told my father,
Just before hmmm, I was born,
“I got a boy child’s comin,
He’s gonna be, he’s gonna be a rollin stone,
Sure ‘nough, he’s a rollin stone
Sure ‘nough, he’s a rollin stone”
(“Rollin’ Stone” by Muddy Waters)

Except, that boy is no match for Anna Rose – where the road is home and true spirit of Rock ‘N’ Roll becomes synonymous with ‘Beat Culture’ of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road.” In the past two years Rose has proved herself as a Rock singer/songwriter. The 27 year-old has strong beliefs in the importance of live music. Touring has allowed Rose to feel – connecting with her fans on multiple platfiorms. “I always feel that music is extremely individual and during live performances my records are more Rock ‘N’ Roll because I am less introverted, opposed to being in the studio,” said Rose. As Rose heads for Fairfield Theatre Company with her electric guitarist she will bring the energy of a full band, but be able to strip it down, “just like it used to be when I started performing solo. It will be interesting to connect with fans with just my guitar and vocals,” said Rose.

Anna Rose Music Digest:

The independent artist and soon-to-be-married rocker is a living reminder that, at the end of the day, music is what keeps us going. “On tour is the only place where you can connect with fans and the band. Digestion of music has become so rapid – put on Shazam and it tells you who the artist is. Being on the road is my favorite time to listen to music because the drummer (guitarist, etc) is going to hear things different than you and it pulls you in – and connects you.” Her latest work “Behold A Pale Horse” is electric and gritty in “Electric Child,” driving in “Because You’re Mine” and “Show Me Your Hands;” but still sexual, intimate and soulful, heard in “Beautiful World”. “The goal is to make what I want to make,” said Rose. For the next record Rose will continue down the same path – Rock ‘N’ Roll, gritty blues, trippy placebo, and still avoid recording crutches like auto-tune. “ I’m still pondering. The writing process has been good [although not all the songs have been written]. I have been holding off until these upcoming shows, but the next record will be full of great pop songs and heavy rock.”

Final thoughts – “The first week I’m touring with Lee Dewyze; excited to meet him and see what he is all about, but moreover I get to talk, listen and perform music all day,” said Rose. “So come out and see Lee an I, but if not, go out and see live music – do something else! But really by that I mean – come see Lee and I (laughs). - Fairfield Mirror


Discography

2016 - Strays In The Cut EP

2013 - Behold A Pale Horse

2010 - Nomad 

2009 - Anna Rose EP

Photos

Bio

Anna Rose is an accomplished singer, songwriter, and guitarist, whose most recent release is the EP Strays In The Cut. Defined as “bluesy rock-n-roll” by Paper Magazine, Rose is walking, singing proof that big things most definitely come in small packages. Strays In The Cut, the much-anticipated follow-up to Rose’s critically acclaimed album, Behold A Pale Horse, is a collection of six mesmerizing tracks that find the fiery singer at the top of her game, pushing musical boundaries in pure, groundbreaking styles. 

To date, Rose has toured all over the world, sharing stages with a variety of notable artists, including Ron Pope, Marc Cohn, Joan Osborne, John Waite, Howie Day, Teddy Geiger, Tony Lucca, Tyler Hilton and founding member of Live, Ed Kowalczyk. Anna has also been a part of many shows with Sofar Sounds and Communion Music, as well as doing specialized recording projects with both Leesta Vall Sound Recordings and Daytrotter. In addition to her work as a solo artist, she is proud to be a member of the Resistance Revival Chorus, a collective of more than 60 women who come together to sing protest songs in the spirit of inclusive joy & resistance. 

Anna is very passionate about giving back, both through music & service work. Green Chimneys, Daniel’s Music Foundation and MILE (Music Is Love Exchange) are three organizations she works with often. Additionally, she is devoted to volunteering at various animal rescues & homeless shelters around the country.

Band Members