Escaping Pavement
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Escaping Pavement

Ferndale, Michigan, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF

Ferndale, Michigan, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2014
Duo Americana Folk

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

May
18
Escaping Pavement @ Last Minute Folk Series

Topeka, Kansas, United States

Topeka, Kansas, United States

Apr
16
Escaping Pavement @ RadLiCoaux House Concert

Radford, Virginia, United States

Radford, Virginia, United States

Feb
09
Escaping Pavement @ Great Falls Theatrics

Great Falls, Virginia, United States

Great Falls, Virginia, United States

Music

Press


"Escaping Pavement-The Night Owl"

The phrase, Escaping Pavement means more to singer-songwriters Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz than their band’s name; they see it as a life mantra. “In this very technology-based day and age, we feel it is more important now than ever to hold on to the things that ground us and remind us we’re all in this together,” says Emily.

The Detroit, MI-based duo, which arose from the ashes of a quartet, recently released their sophomore project, The Night Owl - and boy, is it good.

The Night Owl is a compilation of stories about life’s complexities and the ways we handle them. Themes such as the search for true happiness, the loss of a loved one, and the aftermath of a tragedy are found throughout the record. The album begins with the gently guitar strumming of 'Wanderers', before heading into both the rueful 'Sweetest Lady' and the upbeat bluegrass new age feel of 'Fuel The Fire'.

The laid-back mandolin-themed 'Dumb Luck' is next and, for me personally, is one of the true stand out highlights of this delightful, rich album. A cover of Bob Dylan's 1963 cut 'Girl From The North Country' is next and, once again, it's Aaron's vocals that steer the track home perfectly. Combining some flirtatious mandolin work, re-harmonization's, and a chance for Emily to vocally come to the fore also, the track pays its dues to the original; whilst always remaining its own.

The subtle string work and melodies of 'Mary' is next, before a real pair of beauties come forth. The first is 'Derailed' ("Suffer in silence, inside these four walls like an island"), a feisty, hard driving bluegrass gem of a track that truly personifies everything great about the band, but then, well, wow - a re-imagined cover of one of my favorite ever John Lennon songs, 'Watching The Wheels'. I have to admit I was skeptical going into its listening, being that the last thing I wanted was for this one song to tarnish my thus-far good memories of this album, as a whole, but I needn't have worried. For 'Watching The Wheels' done by Escaping Pavement is wonderful, absolutely magnificent. As fresh, as inspired, as crisp as it should be here today in 2016 (some 35 years on).

Along next is '3 Weeks', a song that advocates the freedom of mind to do whatever it is you want to do, and that's backed by the title track, a song that has been noted as actually being one of the last songs written for the album. Reminiscent of a traditional hymn, 'The Night Owl' is basically an upbeat spoken word musical reveal about how the Owl is a symbol of wisdom; both within folklore and mythology. The album then comes, sadly, to a close with both 'Silver Lining' (based on the Japanese proverb: "My barn having burned to the ground, I can now see the moon."), and then the smooth twangy baritone guitar and pedal steel ride home of 'Leave The Light On'.

Being hailed as, “One of the best Americana bands out of Detroit, Michigan,” Escaping Pavement hopes to spread its roots-based message far beyond its home state. With a lengthy summer 2016 tour, the pair will be taking their “Americana-master blend” to the west coast and back making stops in Colorado, Indiana, Illinois, California - Exclusive Magazine


"The Lawnmower Playlist: New Local Music from Judy Banker, Escaping Pavement and Border Patrol"

Sometimes, there is amazing music right in your own back yard, and you don't even know about it. Such was the case with Escaping Pavement. Straddling many SeMiBluegrass genres, this vocal/instrumental duo has garnered not only local, but regional and national attention with their hard-driving, vocal-driven approach to acoustic music as exemplified by their superb new album, "The Night Owl". There's a LOT of bluegrass in this duo...from the fiddle-tune laced mandolin licks of Aaron Markovitz or the driving, pounding rhythm guitar work of Emily Burns--she even rips off a killer flatpick solo at the end of "Leave the Light On" that is one Lester Flatt G-Run short of bluegrass perfection! But this band has so much more to offer. Sandwiched in between the first and last songs on the album (which are acoustic/electric guitar-driven American numbers) are eight mandolin/guitar pieces that will blow you mind. Perhaps it is the imagery brought forward by the album title, but this is the type of music I could see myself listening to on a warm summer evening; well after the bars shut down; on a long, lonely ride through the city with the top down and the radio on high; immersed in the music as I ponder the past and careen forward into the unknown future. The partners share not only the songwriting, but the lead vocals and instrumental breaks on this album. Lyrically, these are heartfelt and well constructed songs, but what makes them special is Markovitz' complex mandolin melodies layered over Burns' rhythm guitar. Aaron is able to play incredibly complex passages with killer tone, and an easy-going and smooth style that builds throughout the songs. There's a lot of bluegrass fiddle tune in there, and it wouldn't surprise me if he played in a traditional bluegrass band at some point. Emily likewise can be smooth and subtle, but punctuates her playing with aggressive, percussive accents and jarring fills. She also has a real gift for making a statement with a single blue note in the middle of a passage, instantly adding suspense to the passage and breaking the trance-like melody. Like the best jazz musicians she has complete mastery of when NOT to play a note as well. There are a lot of killer tunes on this album, and I like them all. However, the country roadhouse number "Leave the Light On"--while an outlier with it's electric and slide guitar riffs--is the kind of song that will get in your brain, get you toes tapping and stick with you all day long. - SeMiBluegrass Blog


"Escaping Pavement-New Album + New Single"

Escaping Pavement make sparseness stunning. The acoustic guitar and mandolin crackle together like a mesmerizing bonfire, and the voices of Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz blend together like the azure purple and tawny oranges of vibrant sunset…

Their arrangements never need to be any overly showy folk-rock fling; the pureness of the scant instruments at play, the stringed hollow wood and the two human voices, have enough heart in their harmony to carry each song.




The Ferndale based duo thrive on this close, introspective folk sound, but somehow augment an otherwise intimate occasion and make it tacitly tremendous. Maybe you’re hiking and you come to a clearing and a doe patters right into your path and startles you and the wilderness around you freezes for unmeasurable moments? You know… That’s what Escaping Pavement can do with a song; not to retro-anthropomorphize them into a woodland creature, or anything; but that is part of the idea behind their enchantments… escaping the crowds, clamor and commotion of the city and reconnecting with something organic, getting dirt back under your fingernails and relying exclusively on the bare instrumental necessities for your desired wow-factor.

Now, that’s not to say these two can’t get fired up. “Fuel The Fire” features a kinetic percussive pick upon the mandolin and baritone guitar, fretting along at a furious rate to the point where you could almost run to it…The vocal refrain has just the right amount of twang upon it to give it that Americana charm; but it’s also one of the most demonstrative moments for their complimenting harmonies. They can also bring in a showstopping cover, as with “Girl From The North Country,” dressing in a bit more tinny frills from the banjo and mandolin, while also putting a syrup-thick surge into the vocal intonation.

Their new album, The Night Owl, which comes out June 4th, opens with what could potentially be Escaping Pavement’s theme song, with “Wanderers.” The guitars flourish in with steady pulses and the purring voices hover like a haze in the opening, but it the soundscape starts to take on a fullness, the voices acquire a radiance and the synced strums start to kick along in the chorus, enough to spur you up out of your chair “We ride with the wind on our own….” Get out of the city. Escape pavement…. Let the twangs’ resonating echo fill the quiet spaces in between and find peace between the finer pieces. - Jeff Milo


"An Evening with Escaping Pavement"

Last night, the Wild Goose Meeting House was privileged to host Escaping Pavement, a duo who have performed at venues all over the country this summer. Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz classify themselves as “Americana wildflowers amongst blades of bluegrass.” US Represented talked to Emily and Aaron before the show to learn a little about their background and how they developed their signature sound.

US Represented: Your website bio says that you graduated from the Los Angeles Music Academy College of Music and then moved back home to the Detroit area. Tell us more about the evolution of your music.

Emily: We’ve been playing together for about 10 years. Originally we were a quartet, and our first album is our whole group, but eventually we decided that we travel easier as a duo, and that it’s a better fit for our style, sort of like a good suit.

US Represented: Can you tell us more about your individual style of Americana?

Emily: Well, we used to call ourselves “Americana on the rocks with a splash of folk.” But I think we’re leaning more to the bluegrass side since Aaron has gotten more into the mandolin.

Aaron: I decided to see what might happen if I worked more mandolin into our music, and since the mando is featured frequently in bluegrass, it was natural that our music evolved in the same direction.

US Represented: So do you find that you’ve had some influences from the folk music of the sixties, like Joni Mitchell and others?

Emily: Definitely. Also, my parents listened to lots of different music when I was a kid, like Benny Goodman, Steve Winwood, Bach, Mozart, and Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young.

Aaron: We can relate to Mitchell because she crossed so many boundaries by experimenting with sound and other musicians, from Jaco Pastorius to Charles Mingus. Through this, she invented original sounds.

US Represented: You’ve traveled almost 5,000 miles on your “And Then There Were Two” tour. What was your favorite venue?

Aaron: We had a great show in Pasadena a couple of weeks ago. We had a great reception, and the audience was very appreciative.

Emily: Yeah, I’d rather play to 10 appreciative listeners than 200 drunks, because there is a give and take, and if the audience responds, we do better.

Aaron: We like playing in the here and now, and we enjoy the exchange of energy between ourselves and the crowd.

Because Escaping Pavement was to be followed by local favorites Smith House, Emily asked if they would be a good fit together. Sure, we said, because both groups have a certain organic, down-to-earth connection with the audience, which makes it easy to build rapport for a good live performance.

The duo opened with “Watching the Wheels,” a John Lennon cover that set the tone for an entertaining evening. They had mentioned doing a few covers, but they keep some anchor points of each cover and take it in a new, personalized direction. We were fascinated by the folksy twist they put on “Watching the Wheels,” with harmonies that completely diverged from the original. The addition of the mandolin deftly re-classified this Lennon classic into Americana. It was not the last time we would be pleasantly surprised by their choices.

Their original music, like “Here Again,” mixes soothing harmonies with tasteful inflections neatly blended into thoughtful chord changes. At times, they shift into a slower, throatier country blues, sort of standing-by-the-train-tracks music. They could have a big, big sound in a five-piece band with a keyboard and slide guitar or dobro, but they do fine with some added intimacy and interplay between just two people.

Escaping Pavement’s favorite cover is Oasis’s “Wonderwall,” which is a playful version with delicate harmonies and unexpected deviations from the original. They share the vocals, taking turns at harmony and lead. Other covers during the show included Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire,” to which they gave a blues and country feel, and Stevie Wonder’s “Pastime Paradise.”

Their most soulful and compositionally ambitious song of the night was “Silver Lining.” Emily played a hollow-body electric guitar and used a whammy bar to good effect. Their shared vocals bridged with elegant harmonies were an opportunity for her voice to soar above the melodic narrative. “Dust From the Moon” is possibly their most breakout-ready song, something that could break hearts in Nashville. “Fuel the Fire” is also worth a listen: it’s a foreboding up-tempo bluegrass number in minor progression, with smashing guitar and slippery-quick mandolin riffs.

Escaping Pavement only had an hour to perform before Smith House took the stage, yet their easy, flowing style set the mood and filled the Wild Goose with people who raved about the duo. “I can see them breaking out into the mainstream in the next year or so,” we heard one guest say. We had to agree.

Learn more about Escaping Pavement and listen for yourself at:

https://www.youtube.com/user/EscapingPavement

https://soundcloud.com/escapingpavementband

https://www.facebook.com/EscapingPavementBand

This article was co-written by DeLyn Martineau and Eric Stephenson. - US Represented


"Local music highlights at AB&E"

This Ferndale based duo is one to watch. The minimalist pair (Emily Burns & Aaron Markovitz) demonstrate a superb sense for harmony between their vocals and their strums on the mandolin and baritone guitar. It's bluegrass-Americana revivalism that warms the heart. - Detroit Free Press-Jeff Milo


"Escaping Pavement-Something good out of Detroit-Front Range Scribble Review"

With all the bad news the city of Detroit has been receiving due to the city filing bankruptcy, it is refreshing to see something good from the city. Escaping Pavement out of Detroit, released their debut CD Uprooted in June of this year. The quartet is made up of Emily Burns, Aaron Markovitz, Niall Sullivan and Evan Profant. Their music is a blend of rock, country, folk and americana. Emily and Aaron share lead vocal duties and guitar while Niall handles bass and background vocals and Evan plays drums and background vocals. Emily and Aaron have been working together ever since they met at an open mic night. The two have played in various bands, worked on cruise ships and attended the Los Angles Music Academy College of Music together.

escaping pavement

About the CD they describe it “If you listen to the lyrics of every song on the record, you can bring it all back to being uprooted in some way,” Aaron says. “It comes down to change, someone’s life changing in a way that’s out of their hands, like loss, or someone wanting change themselves. Being uprooted in life happens to everyone,” Emily says.

The songs are just good down to earth songs about life. The acoustic version of the song “Burn This Bridge” while good, I enjoyed the full version a whole lot more. The electric guitars and the drum really add to the song for me. Of the four songs I have heard from the CD my favorite was “Here Again” with the lyrics that are so relatable:

“Everything is headed for the wrong
Money in the bank well it’s all gone
Still you’re headed for
your surcharge ATM
You’ve got mouths to feed
But who cares about them and now we’re

Here Again
In this broken dream
Here Again
On this crazy scene
Here Again
For reasons I can’t see
Here Again
But for the last time”

The group has several shows this month in Austin, TX, Nashville and then back to Michigan. You can learn more about them by going to http://www.escapingpavement.com I will be featuring a couple of songs off the UprootedCD on Front Range Radio this Sunday. - Front Range Scribbles


"Escaping Pavement-UpRooted"

Dual gender vocals that embrace Americana, country and roots rock feelings, with banjo fills and a semblance of twang Uprooted surprisingly steers more toward a folk spirit than anything else. Rustic and graceful, there’s still plenty of playfulness with blues ideas, as these old souls in young bodies pen warm, sincere songs that digest so easily. - InForty Music Blog


"UpRooted-Wildy's World Review"

Escaping Pavement co-lead vocalists Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz met as teenagers at a blues open mic night, and they have not been apart in the ten years since then. Over time the pair has added Niall Sullivan (bass/backing vox) and Evan Profant (drums/backing vox) to become one of the most dynamic Americana/rock bands out of Detroit, Michigan. Burns and Markovitz split lead vocal and lead guitar duties, opening up a realm of possibilities with their mix of personal styles. Escaping Pavement’s debut album, UpRooted, shows a delicious mix of Americana, country and classic rock styles, with two dynamic vocalists giving it all they’ve got.
UpRooted opens with “Burn This Bridge”, a solid opening rocker with a bit of muted attitude. Vocalist Emily Burns has glorious pipes, but the vocals are mixed way too high here, giving the ensemble an unbalanced sound. ”Daydream’s Haze” is a gently rolling rocker that gets your toes tapping. It’s a solid album track that’s a comfortable listen. “Here Again” finds Aaron Markovitz taking over in a definite 1970′s groove ala The Doobie Brothers. The southern rock flavor continues on “Smoke Filled Existence”, a guitar driven anthem that would be right at home on an old school AOR format radio station.
Burns takes the lead on “Part of Goodbye”, sounding more than a little like singer Jess Klein. There’s a delicious energy to this blues-infused rocker that will get your toes tapping. “On The Wind” is built around a catchy, extended guitar riff. The path to freedom here is flight in one of the more melodically intriguing songs on the album. Markovitz is out front this time around, and his understated delivery is ideal for the song. “Drive Me to Sadness” finds Markowitz at his best, with a soulful Americana sound ala Darius Rucker. This is the catchiest song on the album, and the one most like to breach the crystal tower of commercial radio. Markovitz and Burns share vocals on “Winter Homecoming”, a folk rocker with a Celtic inspired riff at its core. It feels as if Escaping Pavement is really hiring their stride as the album progresses. The band closes with “4th of July”, with Burns out front for a languorous blues rocker that clocks in at nearly five-and-a-half minutes. Burns is on top of her game, and Escaping Pavement is as tight as a band can be.
Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz make the most of their talents, as well as those of their dynamic rhythm section on UpRooted. Escaping Pavement really hits their stride about mid-album and never looks back. The band manages to capture a live aesthetic on UpRooted, giving listeners an insight into the Escaping Pavement’s elemental on-stage feel. Despite some early production issues, UpRooted will be remembered as one of the best Americana debuts of 2013.
Rating: 4 Stars (Out of 5) - Wildy Haskell


"Backstage Pass: Escaping Pavement"

An old, americana sound is hard to come by these days around Detroit. With so many different genres floating around the city, it seems like traditional tunes are few and far between. Escaping Pavement are fairly new around town, but have strong roots thanks to the phenomenal duo of Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz, who have for the last couple of years been putting the final pieces into their musical puzzle.

“Aaron and I have been playing together in various bands for at least 7 years now. Escaping Pavement is kind of a culmination of all the things we’ve learned and kept with us from being in those other bands,” said Emily.

It’s a combination between their beautiful harmonization, country edge, and energetic backing that makes for a show not to be missed. Dabbling in a little bit of everything fun and western, front woman Emily Burns describes their sound nicely, “Americana on the rocks with a splash of folk. Or it’s also been referred to as Folk-rockin altercana.”

Not only do they showcase their wonderful talents around the Metro-Detroit area, but also throughout the state of Michigan and beyond. Having played multiple shows at Short’s Pub, one of Michigan’s premiere craft breweries, goes to show that having a strong blend between creating new music and establishing new fans, is a healthy mix.

“Of course it’s important to create new material to keep things interesting for both us and our fans. At the same time, I think we have the most success gaining new fans by playing our music live in different markets,” said Emily.

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“I hope to see the music industry thriving with independent artists making a living on live shows and merchandise. Although I don’t see much hope for the recorded music market with the way things are headed now.” - OurTunez-Chaz Parks


"Ferndale Musician Coming Home-Daily Tribune & Macomb Daily"

Article from The Daily Tribune & The Macomb Daily (Oakland County, MI) published July 22nd, 2013
Ferndale Musician Coming Home
By: Tom Watts

Aaron Markovitz grew up as a musician in Ferndale before leaving to Los Angeles to define his trade as an electric guitarist.

During a span of 10 years, Markovitz’s journey took him to music school in L.A. to playing on cruise ships, and a trip back to Ferndale where Markovitz has returned home with a band, Escaping Pavement, his first album, “UpRooted,” and now a CD release party on Friday, July 26, at The Loving Touch in Ferndale with special guests The Blue Flowers and Cold Tone Harvest.

Doors open at 8 p.m. There is no cover.

“I know whatever happens at this moment we are giving this our best shot,” Markovitz said Thursday. “We have all these songs to offer and working hard and moving ahead the best possible way we can.”

Markovitz, 26, said “UpRooted” represents a “coming home to America” after a long journey on the road.

“It’s kind of a highlight of everything that has been happening over the last 5 or 6 years,” he said. “Emily Burns and I met 10 years ago and have been playing together for 8 of those years. We finally got something together; able to find a sound, and now a debut album.”

Escaping Pavement is made up of singer/songwriters Markovitz and Burns, while the quartet also features Niall Sullivan on bass and background vocals, and Evan Profant on drums and background vocals.
Markovitz said he met Burns, 25, of Oxford, at a blues open mic night and the two have been writing songs together ever since with their roots in classic rock n’ roll. He said the band’s sound is a mix of country, folk, Americana, and rock, and has been compared to artists like The Band, The Black Crowes, and Emmylou Harris.

“‘UpRooted’ is an American roots album,”Markovitz explained. “A few numbers are rock based. But the reason we call it ‘UpRooted’ is, when you listen to the songs and lyrics, it all comes back to someone being uprooted.”

Markovitz, who has performed with musicians such as The Platters and Derek Trucks of the Allman Brothers Band, performed on cruise tours and at festivals, including the Detroit Blues Festival, Royal Caribbean’s Enchantment of the Seas, Van’s Warped Tour, and Oceania Cruises, although he crafted his music while attending Los Angeles Music Academy College of Music.

“The songs on the album all go back to those experiences,” he said. “I have grown to like all the songs on the album, but a couple of them stand out.

“I like ‘Winter Homecoming,’ it’s a little different, a dialogue song, a duet where we both sing,” he said. “It just happened that it was the last song written for the record, and just came together and was interesting that way. And ‘Drive Me to Sadness’ is a song written later and seemed to have happened more in studio than planned out beforehand.”

The band’s debut album took time to write and produce, but there would be no compromising the end result.

“The album comes over a 10-year period,” Markovitz said. “Early on it was just figuring out which direction to go, and feeling a bit lost on the way. Dealing with a lot of traveling, trying different things, and figuring out what the next step will be — drawing from things I wasn’t sure about. Like a cruise ship taking off, I felt uprooted.”
Now, Markovitz is back at home where it all started.

“The Loving Touch seems like a cool place, a cool music venue, and we feel fortunate to have our album release party there,” he said. “It’s a good spot. I know recently Ferndale has become a good place to be, a lot of music going on there. I feel a bit more part of it — really a tribute to the music scene.”

Before the CD release party, Markovitz and Burns are playing seven shows in Austin, Texas, and Nashville, Tenn., to promote the album.

“We are going to try and push this,” he said. “We are always writing new songs and thinking about a next album. We want to get back in the studio again.”

“UpRooted” was produced at Tempermill Studios in Ferndale with the assistance of engineer Tony Hamera.

“I know our commitment to do this is there,” Markovitz concluded. “We want to play as many shows as we can. We know it’s the best stuff we’ve done together and will continue with that feeling and write more and keep playing.” - Tom Watts


"TRAVEL INFLUENCES LOCAL BAND’S FIRST ALBUM, ‘UPROOTED’-Woodward Talk"

FERNDALE — Aaron Markovitz’s music career has taken the Ferndale native from his hometown to Los Angeles and even to the open sea as he played on cruise ships. But ultimately, Markovitz ended up back at home to see his career blossom.

Markovitz, 26, is the lead guitarist and singer for Escaping Pavement, a Detroit-based Americana band that dabbles in rock, folk and country. On June 26, the band released its first album, “UpRooted,” during a launch party in Ferndale.

Yet, if it hadn’t been for his time on the West Coast or on cruise ships, the opportunity to release an album may not have happened, Markovitz said.

“In Los Angeles, we went into the studio and recorded a couple of songs, but at that point, it was too costly and we didn’t finish it,” he said. “When we got back here, we had the idea that we wanted to record an album, so we went on the cruise ships to get money together and make it happen. This has been something we have wanted to do for a long time, but we took a bit of a hard way to get here.”

Markovitz started playing guitar at the age of 7 when he would hang out with his neighbors and listen to them play. From there, he started listening to Nirvana and learning new songs, but it wasn’t until 2005 when he met Emily Burns that things started coming together for his music career.

Burns, an Oxford native, met Markovitz during an open mic night in Lake Orion and the two kindled a friendship that has lasted. The two played in a couple of bands together but, eventually, they both wanted to attend music school out in Los Angeles.

“We went out to Los Angeles in 2007 and the program was a one-year program, so we went to school five days a week and then stayed out there for a little while, for about two years,” Markovitz said. “We met a lot of cool people and musicians and (were) writing a lot of songs those years. We put the effort in to get something going.”

Through moving and cruise ships and multiple bands, Markovitz and Burns have remained together, playing music. While other bands rotate through people on a frequent basis, Burns said she and Markovitz have just stayed connected since the first time they met.

“I think sometimes you play with certain people and it’s really some kind of a connection with them — who knows what it is, really, but you have something that works really well when you play together,” Burns, 25, said. “We can read where one another is going with something and we get ideas from each other and feed off each other. With all the hard work we have had to do to get to this point, we have just kept playing together.”

When Markovitz and Burns got back from their cruise-ship- playing days, they reconnected with some friends — drummer Evan Profant and bass guitarist Niall Sullivan. Profant was a former high school classmate of Burns and played with the duo for some time, while Sullivan auditioned to go on the cruise ship but didn’t end up going.

Through all the former band members and the current lineup, Escaping Pavement has found their sound in a unique way, Burns said.

“We have tried so many different variations of our group, and each time someone plays with us and leaves, they have all left their little stamp and influence on us,” she said. “If you are specifically listening, you can hear those influences popping through from the past. It all blends into Americana and country now, but from the vocals and the lyrics to the background music and the guitar solos, you can hear those influences still.”

The recording process was a different task altogether, Markovitz said, and didn’t go exactly as they had expected.

“It takes a while to have a song come together as it is on the album,” he said. “Some of the songs were written quite a ways before the recording process and a few songs were written kind of halfway when we went into the studio. Some songs, we rehearsed them and went through them to make changes and tighten up, and others, we wrote in the studio and hadn’t played them much, but they worked out.”

Markovitz remains in Ferndale and Burns has made her way to the city, as well. While it has taken almost 10 years for the duo to find the right band members and get everything together for an album, they said it has been worth the wait and hard work.

“The theme of the album, ‘UpRooted’ — that is the way we felt the past few years, kind of not knowing the direction to get things done,” Markovitz said. “We were going different paths, and some things worked out and some did not work out, so we had to change directions. We did a lot of traveling, but we wanted to come back home.

“It really is something to see something like the album come together, finally, in a finished product. It is definitely a pretty satisfying thing.” - Josh Gordon


"UpRooted-Rootstime Review"

(Translated from Dutch)

The U.S. automotive city of Detroit in Michigan is known in the region as a center for business, culture and as logistics and financial center. But the city also provides excellent musicians on a regular basis off which usually stick together and form a group.

One such formations is “Escaping Pavement ‘, a quartet around the 26-year-old singer-songwriter Aaron Markovitz and the 25-year-old singer and songwriter Emily Burns. For the rhythm section of the group provide Niall Sullivan bassist and drummer Evan Profant.

Although the two central figures of the band, who met during a free stage, more than 10 years in the music business, is the recently released album “Uprooted” on their debut album. It came about after they had occurred on a cruise ship to the necessary money for the recording of the album to amass. Both for one year Both co-wrote nine Americana and country rock songs on this CD that they just sing alternately and occasionally together.

The album starts with the song “Burn This Bridge” that you can listen to. Attached to video Then Emily Burns takes the vocal lead in the country song “Daydream’s Haze”, a song which, like almost all other tracks is provided thoughtful and meaningful lyrics about life, love and all kinds of moods that involves. For “Here Again” is then Aaron Markovitz who takes the vocals on his behalf.

In our humble opinion the best song on “Uprooted” is the song “Winter Homecoming” in which both vocalists singing perform a kind of conversation with dialogues that take place between two people with different opinions. The foregoing ballad “Drive Me To Sadness” belongs to the better work on this album.

‘To uproot’ literally means ‘uprooting’ and there are both musicians for quite some time doing. The detaching of entrenched situations, explore new horizons and develop a kind of vagabond existence. To get away from his roots and the familiar everyday existence, sung in “Smoke Filled Existence”, is something ‘Escaping Pavement’ everyone would like to recommend because it is so enriching for life and for the mind. - Freddy Celis


"The Upbeat: Escaping Pavement"

By: Gary Graff
Published Jan. 5th, 2014

Formed: 2011 in Ferndale

Sound: Americana on the rocks with a splash of folk

Members: Emily Burns-vocals, guitars, organ; Aaron Markovitz-vocals, guitars, organ, mandolin; Niall Sullivan-bass, vocals; Evan Profant-drums, vocals

Influences: The Band, The Civil Wars, and T-Bone Burnett among others

Day Jobs: Burns is a server at Vinsetta Garage in Berkley, Markovitz is an independent construction contractor based in Ferndale, Sullivan is a CAD designer, and Profant is a youth pastor at Christ the King Church in Oxford.

What's in a name?: Burns says the Escaping Pavement moniker "came from the kind of feeling we wanted to evoke about our music-that it's rustic and make you feel as though you are 'getting away from it all.' We wanted the name to immediately give people an idea of the kind of music we play, and after throwing a bunch of ideas around we settled on Escaping Pavement."

Ministering to the flock: Not many bands have their own pastor in the lineup, and Burns says the rest of the group is mindful of Profant's position. "To be honest, the rest of us in the band, we're not very religious, but we know it's a really big thing for Evan. We really respect him for that and support everything he does, because we think it's really good. And we try to watch our P's and Q's around him too."

Favorite Gig: Burns recalls the group's CD release party on July 26th at The Loving Touch in Ferndale as "an amazing night. We were shocked at how many people were in attendance; there were easily 250-plus people there. We had never had this many people at one of our shows. The overwhelming outpouring of support that night really floored us and made us feel that we have a really large group of people that really care about our band and our music-which it seems is easy to feel insecure about sometimes as a musician."

Hear 'Em: Escaping Pavement has released one album, "UpRooted."

See 'Em: Escaping Pavement performs with Ryan Dillaha and the Miracle Men, and the Barbarossa Brothers on Jan. 17th at The Magic Stick, 4120 Woodward Ave., Detroit. Doors open at 8 p.m. Admission is $5. Call 313-833-9700 or visit www.majesticdetroit.com.

Surf 'Em: www.escapingpavement.com - The Oakland Press: Gary Graff


"UpRooted-Along the Journey REview"

Detroit, Michigan’s Escaping Pavement have been on a musical journey for the past ten years and, with their latest album, UpRooted, they’re finally coming home.

Formed by teenage guitarists and dreamers, Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz, when the two met at an open mic night at a blues club and have been kindred musical souls ever since. Schooling at the Los Angeles Music Academy College of Music helped the duo to fine tune their skills while exposing them to genres like “rock, pop, jazz, reggae, blues, and funk,” trying “various band permutations within these stylistic guises.”
The songs of UpRooted were birthed on a unique journey of its own as the band took to the high seas for inspiration and cash to record their debut.

“At that point we got the crazy idea to go play music on a cruise ship in order to gather some money to record our debut album. So, we disappeared to sea for a year, playing every song you could think of on a cruise ship,” Aaron explains. “At the time of our return we started writing the songs for UpRooted.”
And with the addition of bandmates Niall Sullivan on bass and background vocals and Evan Profant delivering drums and background vocals the stage was set for Escaping Pavement to shine.

UpRooted is a nine-song collection of rich, Americana-flavored offerings, elements of country, folk, and rock showing up at various junctures that draws recollections of Emmylou Harris, The Band, and a smattering of others while managing to still be original and definitively Escaping Pavement. “Burn This Bridge” gets things off to a fine start, bluesy electric guitar setting the groove for Burns’ solid vocals, just a hint of twang lending the track swagger while “Daydream’s Haze” employs a more subdued approach, Burns and Markovitz trading vocals over a mid-tempo shuffle, organ fills giving the song additional lift.
Markovitz steps to the forefront on “Here Again,” his vocal rich, resonant, and pleasantly gritty, and steals the show, crooning his way over the plucky arrangement before seguing into the bluesy soul of “Smoke Filled Existence,” a smooth groove setting the tone while soaring background vocals provide killer support. Burns steps back into the spotlight on the modern country rocker, “Part of Goodbye,” lending attitude to the lyric while charged guitars lead the way.

“On the Wind” finds the quartet shifting gears, slowing the tempo a bit as bright guitars, banjo fills, and percussion carry the track alongside an almost chorus of vocals that really works as “Drive Me to Sadness” carries things along with buoyant organ jams and more kicking drums that keep the toe tapping while the lyric searches for happiness. A sprightly mandolin fuels “Winter Homecoming,” Burns and Markovitz trading vocal duties again, while more blues elements, colored with touches of gospel and soul, bring life to album closer, “4th of July.” The great flourishes of electric guitar and Profant’s inspired percussion set the table for Burns’ finest vocal delivery yet as she shows her incredible range, shooting for the stars and hitting a home run on one of the best tracks to be found here.
Detroit, Michigan has a band to be proud of in Escaping Pavement. On UpRooted, they show that they’ve got the chops to hang with the big boys, combining gifted vocals together with strong musical arrangements and songwriting to create a warm atmosphere of Americana-inspired music. It’s honest and creative and speaks to the heart. And who could ask for more than that? - Andrew Greenhalgh


"UpRooted-Inside World Music Review"

Escaping Pavement is a Michigan-based band that explores classic Americana blues, rock, roots, soul, and country with anti-pavement tunes with an Emmylou Harris, Lucinda Williams, and Stevie Nicks’ sound. Lead female vocalist, Emily Burns, sets the tone with a classy voice that centers around folk, pop, and Americana. The crystal clear vocals and instrumental arrangements contain a heavy 1970s feel that is nothing to laugh at. “Daydream’s Haze” opens with a jingly guitar intro and throbbing B3 organ with upbeat drums and a classic vocal lead. The song is folk-tinged and country-cured without any deficiencies. “Part Of Goodbye” contains a folk-centered, rock-tune with vocals akin to Heart throughout. The song is rather punchy, grungy, and infectious. “Winter Homecoming” contains a jaunty guitar, mandolin, and banjo-tuned folk song with both male and female vocals. The Americana song is classic with scintillating strings and varied vocals that do not stray too far from the country roots. Anyone with an interest in Americana folk and rock with a country vein will love Escaping Pavement’s latest tunes on Uprooted. - Matthew Forss


"UpRooted-Middle Tennessee Music Review"

Escaping Pavement are speaking my language on their newest release UpRooted.

Recently finding myself UpRooted, you could say it was appropriate I received this record. Moving your family 2,300+ miles in any direction takes some serious adjustments.

Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz met one night at a blues open mic and have been inseparable ever since. You could say this was meant to be.

“I saw Emily walk in with a Gretsch guitar, get up onstage with the band and play ‘Whipping post’ and ‘What is and What Should Never Be.’ I was impressed and went over and talked to her. I guess it all started at that moment,” Aaron recalls.
Splitting songwriting, singing, and playing duties equally, Emily and Aaron along with Niall Sullivan (bass and background vox) and Evan Profant (drums and background vox) create a sound that is refreshing, genuine, and alive!

UpRooted is what would happen if The Black Crowes got into a bar fight with The Civil Wars. When the dust settled, Emmylou Harris would be there with a peace treaty and a vision. That vision is Escaping Pavement.

This Los Angeles Music Academy educated, Detroit, Michigan based quartet entered Tempermill Studios in Ferndale, MI to create this folk-rockin’-altercana master blend. Emily produced the album with the help of engineer Tony Hamera.

“If you listen to the lyrics of every song on the record, you can bring it all back to being uprooted in some way,” Aaron says. “It comes down to change, someone’s life changing in a way that’s out of their hands, like loss, or someone wanting to change themselves. Being uprooted in life happens to everyone,” Emily says.
Everything the band has been working on for the past several years has led up to this release and it is fine wine, folks.

Go grab UpRooted. Then connect with the band on Facebook or Twitter. - Joshua Smotherman


"iRadio stations with songs from UpRooted in rotation"

Check out these great iRadio stations currently featuring some of the tracks off of ‘UpRooted’. Click on the station title to be taken to their site and don’t forget to request ‘Escaping Pavement’ while you’re there!

Bohemio Radio
Women of Substance Radio
Euterpia
Fuzz
Music Alley
Indie Music Sampler
8 Tracks
Deli Radio
DJ Lucy Radio Show (Japanese Radio)
The Penguin
Best Unheard Music Radio
BRCFP Radio
Class X Radio
Isis Radio - Various


"Podcasts/Podcaster Reviews"

Association of Music Podcasting
Episode #411
Features, Burn This Bridge submitted by Matt Brier of Idiosyncratic Transmissions
“Escaping Pavement’s success will inevitably be traced to two factors: 1. The two founding members, Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz, studied music closely in college taking in a variety of styles and 2. They both share a love and reverence for the music that has come before. Escaping Pavement blends a mix of Americana and Folk for an incredibly engaging sound. Burn This Bridge is from their album UpRooted.”
Listen at http://musicpodcasting.org

Idiosyncratic Podcast
Episode #102
Listen at http://www.idiosyncratictransmissions.com/

Podcast for Peace
Episode #406
Listen at http://www.podcastforpeace.com/

The Bugcast
Episode #282
Listen at http://thebugcast.org

Driving Socrates
Episodes #395, #403 & #406
Listen at http://drivingsocrates.com/

JogTunes Indie Podcast
Episode #97
Listen at http://jogtunes.com/jti/jtcpodcast.php
iTunes Subscribe/download-click here

Idiosyncratic Podcast
Episode #96
Listen at http://www.idiosyncratictransmissions.com/

Podcast for Peace
Episodes #403, #397 & #395
Listen at http://www.podcastforpeace.com/

The Bugcast
Episode #272
Listen at http://thebugcast.org

Under Country with Neil Smith
Escaping Pavement co-hosted Episode #77
Listen at http://undercountry.podomatic.com - Various


"UPROOTED-INFORTY MUSIC BLOG REVIEW"

Dual gender vocals that embrace Americana, country and roots rock feelings, with banjo fills and a semblance of twang Uprootedsurprisingly steers more toward a folk spirit than anything else. Rustic and graceful, there’s still plenty of playfulness with blues ideas, as these old souls in young bodies pen warm, sincere songs that digest so easily. - InForty-Ton Haugen


"iRadio stations"

IRadio stations with songs from UpRooted currently in their rotation:

Bohemio Radio-http://www.bohemioradio.com/
Women Of Substance Radio-http://www.womenofsubstanceradio.com
Euterpia-http://www.euterpia-radio.fr/2013/11/03/euterpia-rado-066-cest-dur-detre-un-chat
Fuzz-http://fuzz.com/station/1964/Eclectic-Indie
Music Alley-http://www.musicalley.com
Indie Music Sampler-http://indiemusicsampler.com/?p=2360
8 Tracks-http://8tracks.com/
Deli Radio-http://deliradio.com/
DJ Lucy Radio Show (Japanese Radio)-http://lucytakakura.wordpress.com/2013/08/27/ams272p/
The Penguin-http://thepenguinrocksnj.blogspot.com/2013/09/playlist-for-september-1-15-2013.html
Best Unheard Music Radio-http://www.live365.com/stations/unheardmusic
BRCFP Radio-http://www.live365.com/stations/allsortsman
Class X Radio-http://classxradio.com/index.php
Isis Radio-http://www.isisradio.net/ - Various


"Association of Music Podcasting Feature"

Episode #411-Escaping Pavement is a featured artist. Submited by Matt Brier of Idiosyncratic Transmissions
Escaping Pavement’s success will inevitably be traced to two factors: 1. The two founding members, Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz, studied music closely in college taking in a variety of styles and 2. They both share a love and reverence for the music that has come before. Escaping Pavement blends a mix of Americana and Folk for an incredibly engaging sound. Burn This Bridge is from their album UpRooted. - Association of Music Podcasting


"Podcast for Peace features"

Escaping Pavement songs featured on episodes #406, #403, #397, #395. Episodes available for listening at http://www.podcastforpeace.com/ - Podcast for Peace


"Driving Socrates Podcast Features"

Escaping Pavement has songs featured on episodes #395, #403, & #406.

Available for listening at http://drivingsocrates.com/?p=2748 - Driving Socrates Podcast


"Idiosyncratic Podcast Feature"

Episode #96 & #102-Escaping Pavement is a featured artist with one song off of UpRooted. Available to listen at http://www.idiosyncratictransmissions.com/2013/09/idiosyncratic-transmissions-podcast-episode-96/
http://www.idiosyncratictransmissions.com/2013/10/idiosyncratic-transmissions-podcast-episode-102/ - Idiosyncratic Podcasts


"Escaping Pavement-UpRooted Album Review"

Escaping Pavement co-lead vocalists Emily Burns and Aaron Markowitz met as teenagers at a blues open mic night, and they have not been apart in the ten years since then. Over time the pair has added Niall Sullivan (bass/backing vox) and Evan Profant (drums/backing vox) to become one of the most dynamic Americana/rock bands out of Detroit, Michigan. Burns and Markowitz split lead vocal and lead guitar duties, opening up a realm of possibilities with their mix of personal styles. Escaping Pavement’s debut album, UpRooted, shows a delicious mix of Americana, country and classic rock styles, with two dynamic vocalists giving it all they’ve got.

UpRooted opens with "Burn This Bridge", a solid opening rocker with a bit of muted attitude. Vocalist Emily Burns has glorious pipes, but the vocals are mixed way too high here, giving the ensemble an unbalanced sound. "Daydream's Haze" is a gently rolling rocker that gets your toes tapping. It's a solid album track that's a comfortable listen. "Here Again" finds Aaron Markowitz taking over in a definite 1970's groove ala The Doobie Brothers. The southern rock flavor continues on "Smoke Filled Existence", a guitar driven anthem that would be right at home on an old school AOR format radio station.

Burns takes the lead on "Part of Goodbye", sounding more than a little like singer Jess Klein. There's a delicious energy to this blues-infused rocker that will get your toes tapping. "On The Wind" is built around a catchy, extended guitar riff. The path to freedom here is flight in one of the more melodically intriguing songs on the album. Markowitz is out front this time around, and his understated delivery is ideal for the song. "Drive Me to Sadness" finds Markowitz at his best, with a soulful Americana sound ala Darius Rucker. This is the catchiest song on the album, and the one most like to breach the crystal tower of commercial radio. Markowitz and Burns share vocals on "Winter Homecoming", a folk rocker with a Celtic inspired riff at its core. It feels as if Escaping Pavement is really hiring their stride as the album progresses. The band closes with "4th of July", with Burns out front for a languorous blues rocker that clocks in at nearly five-and-a-half minutes. Burns is on top of her game, and Escaping Pavement is as tight as a band can be.

Emily Burns and Aaron Markowitz make the most of their talents, as well as those of their dynamic rhythm section on UpRooted. Escaping Pavement really hits their stride about mid-album and never looks back. The band manages to capture a live aesthetic on UpRooted, giving listeners an insight into the Escaping Pavement’s elemental on-stage feel. Despite some early production issues, UpRooted will be remembered as one of the best Americana debuts of 2013.

Rating: 4 Stars (Out of 5) - Wildy's World


"UpRooted with Escaping Pavement"

Escaping Pavement are speaking my language on their newest release UpRooted.
Recently finding myself UpRooted, you could say it was appropriate I received this record. Moving your family 2,300+ miles in any direction takes some serious adjustments.
Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz met one night at a blues open mic and have been inseparable ever since. You could say this was meant to be.
“I saw Emily walk in with a Gretsch guitar, get up onstage with the band and play ‘Whipping post’ and ‘What is and What Should Never Be.’ I was impressed and went over and talked to her. I guess it all started at that moment,” Aaron recalls.
Splitting songwriting, singing, and playing duties equally, Emily and Aaron along with Niall Sullivan (bass and background vox) and Evan Profant (drums and background vox) create a sound that is refreshing, genuine, and alive!

UpRooted is what would happen if The Black Crowes got into a bar fight with The Civil Wars. When the dust settled, Emmylou Harris would be there with a peace treaty and a vision. That vision is Escaping Pavement.
This Los Angeles Music Academy educated, Detroit, Michigan based quartet entered Tempermill Studios in Ferndale, MI to create this folk-rockin’-altercana master blend. Emily produced the album with the help of engineer Tony Hamera.
“If you listen to the lyrics of every song on the record, you can bring it all back to being uprooted in some way,” Aaron says. “It comes down to change, someone’s life changing in a way that’s out of their hands, like loss, or someone wanting to change themselves. Being uprooted in life happens to everyone,” Emily says.
Everything the band has been working on for the past several years has led up to this release and it is fine wine, folks.
Go grab UpRooted. Then connect with the band on Facebook or Twitter.

Read more at http://www.midtnmusic.com/uprooted-with-escaping-pavement/#G4iDj0hgGy1yQo7o.99 - Middle Tennessee Music Blog


"CD Review: Escaping Pavement's 'Uprooted'"

Escaping Pavement is a Michigan-based band that explores classic Americana blues, rock, roots, soul, and country with anti-pavement tunes with an Emmylou Harris, Lucinda Williams, and Stevie Nicks' sound. Lead female vocalist, Emily Burns, sets the tone with a classy voice that centers around folk, pop, and Americana. The crystal clear vocals and instrumental arrangements contain a heavy 1970s feel that is nothing to laugh at. "Daydream's Haze" opens with a jingly guitar intro and throbbing B3 organ with upbeat drums and a classic vocal lead. The song is folk-tinged and country-cured without any deficiencies. "Part Of Goodbye" contains a folk-centered, rock-tune with vocals akin to Heart throughout. The song is rather punchy, grungy, and infectious. "Winter Homecoming" contains a jaunty guitar, mandolin, and banjo-tuned folk song with both male and female vocals. The Americana song is classic with scintillating strings and varied vocals that do not stray too far from the country roots. Anyone with an interest in Americana folk and rock with a country vein will love Escaping Pavement's latest tunes on Uprooted. ~ Matthew Forss - Inside World Music Blog


"Review: Escaping Pavement - UpRooted"

Detroit, Michigan’s Escaping Pavement have been on a musical journey for the past ten years and, with their latest album, UpRooted, they’re finally coming home.

Formed by teenage guitarists and dreamers, Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz, when the two met at an open mic night at a blues club and have been kindred musical souls ever since. Schooling at the Los Angeles Music Academy College of Music helped the duo to fine tune their skills while exposing them to genres like “rock, pop, jazz, reggae, blues, and funk,” trying “various band permutations within these stylistic guises.”
The songs of UpRooted were birthed on a unique journey of its own as the band took to the high seas for inspiration and cash to record their debut.

“At that point we got the crazy idea to go play music on a cruise ship in order to gather some money to record our debut album. So, we disappeared to sea for a year, playing every song you could think of on a cruise ship,” Aaron explains. “At the time of our return we started writing the songs for UpRooted.”
And with the addition of bandmates Niall Sullivan on bass and background vocals and Evan Profant delivering drums and background vocals the stage was set for Escaping Pavement to shine.

UpRooted is a nine-song collection of rich, Americana-flavored offerings, elements of country, folk, and rock showing up at various junctures that draws recollections of Emmylou Harris, The Band, and a smattering of others while managing to still be original and definitively Escaping Pavement. “Burn This Bridge” gets things off to a fine start, bluesy electric guitar setting the groove for Burns’ solid vocals, just a hint of twang lending the track swagger while “Daydream’s Haze” employs a more subdued approach, Burns and Markovitz trading vocals over a mid-tempo shuffle, organ fills giving the song additional lift.
Markovitz steps to the forefront on “Here Again,” his vocal rich, resonant, and pleasantly gritty, and steals the show, crooning his way over the plucky arrangement before seguing into the bluesy soul of “Smoke Filled Existence,” a smooth groove setting the tone while soaring background vocals provide killer support. Burns steps back into the spotlight on the modern country rocker, “Part of Goodbye,” lending attitude to the lyric while charged guitars lead the way.

“On the Wind” finds the quartet shifting gears, slowing the tempo a bit as bright guitars, banjo fills, and percussion carry the track alongside an almost chorus of vocals that really works as “Drive Me to Sadness” carries things along with buoyant organ jams and more kicking drums that keep the toe tapping while the lyric searches for happiness. A sprightly mandolin fuels “Winter Homecoming,” Burns and Markovitz trading vocal duties again, while more blues elements, colored with touches of gospel and soul, bring life to album closer, “4th of July.” The great flourishes of electric guitar and Profant’s inspired percussion set the table for Burns’ finest vocal delivery yet as she shows her incredible range, shooting for the stars and hitting a home run on one of the best tracks to be found here.
Detroit, Michigan has a band to be proud of in Escaping Pavement. On UpRooted, they show that they’ve got the chops to hang with the big boys, combining gifted vocals together with strong musical arrangements and songwriting to create a warm atmosphere of Americana-inspired music. It’s honest and creative and speaks to the heart. And who could ask for more than that? - Along the Journey music Blog


"Groove Loves Melody Blog-Back to School Interview Series Part 2"

On today’s installment of the Back-to-School Q&A, we’re honoring the role of teachers and mentors in our continued development. Eleven creative entrepreneurs discuss a teacher’s best advice for their career. Once again, connect and share your thoughts in the comments below using your Facebook, G+, or WordPress login.

Escaping Pavement * Michigan * Americana/folk * @escaping_pavement * www.escapingpavement.com

“Two things. First, that no matter where you are playing, whether it be in your bedroom, or on the stage, always play as if somebody is listening. In other words, always aim to play your best whether it’s for practice or performance. Second piece of advice is more like life advice but also applies greatly to music. Always be open to new experiences. The second you close yourself off, and get comfortable with what you are doing, decide that your way is always the best way, etc. is the second you stop learning and gaining life experience. Which we all know is invaluable as an artist and as a person.” - Groove Loves Melody Blog


"Groove Loves Melody Blog-Back to School Interview Series"

In late July, The NYDailyNews reported that Queen guitarist Brian May was working to complete duets recorded 30 years ago by Queen frontman Freddie Mercury and Michael Jackson. While the world waits to hear that music, this edition of the Back-to-School 2013 Q&A features independent artists and their dream duet performance of who they would love to record or tour with. This edition will also include audio samples of our featured artists so you can hear their work. As always, connect and share your thoughts in the comments below using your Facebook, G+, or WordPress login.

Escaping Pavement * Michigan * Americana/folk * @escaping_pavement * www.escapingpavement.com

“Lady Gaga. Hear us out on this one! She really is an extremely talented musician, songwriter, and artist. She may seem very strange at times, but she can belt it out with the best of em, can write killer rock songs (if you haven’t heard it, check out her song “You and I”) and plays a mean piano. She also did a very cool version of her song “Born This Way” as a country tune. We would love to collaborate in the studio with her and see where her extreme creative abilities could take a song.” - Groove Loves Melody Blog


"JogTunes Podcast feature"

Episode #97-Escaping Pavement is the featured artist with four tunes off of 'UpRooted'. Available for download through iTunes. - JogTunes Indie Podcast


"Escaping Pavement-UpRooted"

(Translated from Dutch)-The U.S. automotive city of Detroit in Michigan is known in the region as a center for business, culture and as logistics and financial center. But the city also provides excellent musicians on a regular basis off which usually stick together and form a group.

One such formations is "Escaping Pavement ', a quartet around the 26-year-old singer-songwriter Aaron Markovitz and the 25-year-old singer and songwriter Emily Burns. For the rhythm section of the group provide Niall Sullivan bassist and drummer Evan Profant.

Although the two central figures of the band, who met during a free stage, more than 10 years in the music business, is the recently released album "Uprooted" on their debut album. It came about after they had occurred on a cruise ship to the necessary money for the recording of the album to amass. Both for one year Both co-wrote nine Americana and country rock songs on this CD that they just sing alternately and occasionally together.

The album starts with the song "Burn This Bridge" that you can listen to. Attached to video Then Emily Burns takes the vocal lead in the country song "Daydream's Haze", a song which, like almost all other tracks is provided thoughtful and meaningful lyrics about life, love and all kinds of moods that involves. For "Here Again" is then Aaron Markovitz who takes the vocals on his behalf.

In our humble opinion the best song on "Uprooted" is the song "Winter Homecoming" in which both vocalists singing perform a kind of conversation with dialogues that take place between two people with different opinions. The foregoing ballad "Drive Me To Sadness" belongs to the better work on this album.

'To uproot' literally means 'uprooting' and there are both musicians for quite some time doing. The detaching of entrenched situations, explore new horizons and develop a kind of vagabond existence. To get away from his roots and the familiar everyday existence, sung in "Smoke Filled Existence", is something 'Escaping Pavement' everyone would like to recommend because it is so enriching for life and for the mind. - Rootstime


"Escaping Pavement-Something good out of Detroit"

With all the bad news the city of Detroit has been receiving due to the city filing bankruptcy, it is refreshing to see something good from the city. Escaping Pavement out of Detroit, released their debut CD Uprooted in June of this year. The quartet is made up of Emily Burns, Aaron Markovitz, Niall Sullivan and Evan Profant. Their music is a blend of rock, country, folk and americana. Emily and Aaron share lead vocal duties and guitar while Niall handles bass and background vocals and Evan plays drums and background vocals. Emily and Aaron have been working together ever since they met at an open mic night. The two have played in various bands, worked on cruise ships and attended the Los Angles Music Academy College of Music together.

About the CD they describe it “If you listen to the lyrics of every song on the record, you can bring it all back to being uprooted in some way,” Aaron says. “It comes down to change, someone’s life changing in a way that’s out of their hands, like loss, or someone wanting change themselves. Being uprooted in life happens to everyone,” Emily says.

The songs are just good down to earth songs about life. The acoustic version of the song “Burn This Bridge” while good, I enjoyed the full version a whole lot more. The electric guitars and the drum really add to the song for me. Of the four songs I have heard from the CD my favorite was “Here Again” with the lyrics that are so relatable:

“Everything is headed for the wrong
Money in the bank well it’s all gone
Still you’re headed for
your surcharge ATM
You’ve got mouths to feed
But who cares about them and now we’re

Here Again
In this broken dream
Here Again
On this crazy scene
Here Again
For reasons I can’t see
Here Again
But for the last time”

The group has several shows this month in Austin, TX, Nashville and then back to Michigan. You can learn more about them by going to http://www.escapingpavement.com I will be featuring a couple of songs off the Uprooted CD on Front Range Radio this Sunday. - Front Range Scribbles


"Travel influences local band’s first album, ‘UpRooted’"

FERNDALE — Aaron Markovitz’s music career has taken the Ferndale native from his hometown to Los Angeles and even to the open sea as he played on cruise ships. But ultimately, Markovitz ended up back at home to see his career blossom.

Markovitz, 26, is the lead guitarist and singer for Escaping Pavement, a Detroit-based Americana band that dabbles in rock, folk and country. On June 26, the band released its first album, “UpRooted,” during a launch party in Ferndale.

Yet, if it hadn’t been for his time on the West Coast or on cruise ships, the opportunity to release an album may not have happened, Markovitz said.

“In Los Angeles, we went into the studio and recorded a couple of songs, but at that point, it was too costly and we didn’t finish it,” he said. “When we got back here, we had the idea that we wanted to record an album, so we went on the cruise ships to get money together and make it happen. This has been something we have wanted to do for a long time, but we took a bit of a hard way to get here.”

Markovitz started playing guitar at the age of 7 when he would hang out with his neighbors and listen to them play. From there, he started listening to Nirvana and learning new songs, but it wasn’t until 2005 when he met Emily Burns that things started coming together for his music career.

Burns, an Oxford native, met Markovitz during an open mic night in Lake Orion and the two kindled a friendship that has lasted. The two played in a couple of bands together but, eventually, they both wanted to attend music school out in Los Angeles.

“We went out to Los Angeles in 2007 and the program was a one-year program, so we went to school five days a week and then stayed out there for a little while, for about two years,” Markovitz said. “We met a lot of cool people and musicians and (were) writing a lot of songs those years. We put the effort in to get something going.”

Through moving and cruise ships and multiple bands, Markovitz and Burns have remained together, playing music. While other bands rotate through people on a frequent basis, Burns said she and Markovitz have just stayed connected since the first time they met.

“I think sometimes you play with certain people and it’s really some kind of a connection with them — who knows what it is, really, but you have something that works really well when you play together,” Burns, 25, said. “We can read where one another is going with something and we get ideas from each other and feed off each other. With all the hard work we have had to do to get to this point, we have just kept playing together.”

When Markovitz and Burns got back from their cruise-ship- playing days, they reconnected with some friends — drummer Evan Profant and bass guitarist Niall Sullivan. Profant was a former high school classmate of Burns and played with the duo for some time, while Sullivan auditioned to go on the cruise ship but didn’t end up going.

Through all the former band members and the current lineup, Escaping Pavement has found their sound in a unique way, Burns said.

“We have tried so many different variations of our group, and each time someone plays with us and leaves, they have all left their little stamp and influence on us,” she said. “If you are specifically listening, you can hear those influences popping through from the past. It all blends into Americana and country now, but from the vocals and the lyrics to the background music and the guitar solos, you can hear those influences still.”

The recording process was a different task altogether, Markovitz said, and didn’t go exactly as they had expected.

“It takes a while to have a song come together as it is on the album,” he said. “Some of the songs were written quite a ways before the recording process and a few songs were written kind of halfway when we went into the studio. Some songs, we rehearsed them and went through them to make changes and tighten up, and others, we wrote in the studio and hadn’t played them much, but they worked out.”

Markovitz remains in Ferndale and Burns has made her way to the city, as well. While it has taken almost 10 years for the duo to find the right band members and get everything together for an album, they said it has been worth the wait and hard work.

“The theme of the album, ‘UpRooted’ — that is the way we felt the past few years, kind of not knowing the direction to get things done,” Markovitz said. “We were going different paths, and some things worked out and some did not work out, so we had to change directions. We did a lot of traveling, but we wanted to come back home.

“It really is something to see something like the album come together, finally, in a finished product. It is definitely a pretty satisfying thing.”

For more information on Escaping Pavement and the album “UpRooted,” visit www.escapingpavement.com. - Woodward Talk


"Ferndale Musician Coming Home"

Aaron Markovitz grew up as a musician in Ferndale before leaving to Los Angeles to define his trade as an electric guitarist.

During a span of 10 years, Markovitz’s journey took him to music school in L.A. to playing on cruise ships, and a trip back to Ferndale where Markovitz has returned home with a band, Escaping Pavement, his first album, “UpRooted,” and now a CD release party on Friday, July 26, at The Loving Touch in Ferndale with special guests The Blue Flowers and Cold Tone Harvest.

Doors open at 8 p.m. There is no cover.

“I know whatever happens at this moment we are giving this our best shot,” Markovitz said Thursday. “We have all these songs to offer and working hard and moving ahead the best possible way we can.”

Markovitz, 26, said “UpRooted” represents a “coming home to America” after a long journey on the road.

“It’s kind of a highlight of everything that has been happening over the last 5 or 6 years,” he said. “Emily Burns and I met 10 years ago and have been playing together for 8 of those years. We finally got something together; able to find a sound, and now a debut album.”


Escaping Pavement is made up of singer/songwriters Markovitz and Burns, while the quartet also features Niall Sullivan on bass and background vocals, and Evan Profant on drums and background vocals.

Markovitz said he met Burns, 25, of Oxford, at a blues open mic night and the two have been writing songs together ever since with their roots in classic rock n’ roll. He said the band’s sound is a mix of country, folk, Americana, and rock, and has been compared to artists like The Band, The Black Crowes, and Emmylou Harris.

“‘UpRooted’ is an American roots album,”Markovitz explained. “A few numbers are rock based. But the reason we call it ‘UpRooted’ is, when you listen to the songs and lyrics, it all comes back to someone being uprooted.”

Markovitz, who has performed with musicians such as The Platters and Derek Trucks of the Allman Brothers Band, performed on cruise tours and at festivals, including the Detroit Blues Festival, Royal Caribbean’s Enchantment of the Seas, Van’s Warped Tour, and Oceania Cruises, although he crafted his music while attending Los Angeles Music Academy College of Music.

“The songs on the album all go back to those experiences,” he said. “I have grown to like all the songs on the album, but a couple of them stand out.

“I like ‘Winter Homecoming,’ it’s a little different, a dialogue song, a duet where we both sing,” he said. “It just happened that it was the last song written for the record, and just came together and was interesting that way. And ‘Drive Me to Sadness’ is a song written later and seemed to have happened more in studio than planned out beforehand.”

The band’s debut album took time to write and produce, but there would be no compromising the end result.

“The album comes over a 10-year period,” Markovitz said. “Early on it was just figuring out which direction to go, and feeling a bit lost on the way. Dealing with a lot of traveling, trying different things, and figuring out what the next step will be — drawing from things I wasn’t sure about. Like a cruise ship taking off, I felt uprooted.”

Now, Markovitz is back at home where it all started.

“The Loving Touch seems like a cool place, a cool music venue, and we feel fortunate to have our album release party there,” he said. “It’s a good spot. I know recently Ferndale has become a good place to be, a lot of music going on there. I feel a bit more part of it — really a tribute to the music scene.”

Before the CD release party, Markovitz and Burns are playing seven shows in Austin, Texas, and Nashville, Tenn., to promote the album.

“We are going to try and push this,” he said. “We are always writing new songs and thinking about a next album. We want to get back in the studio again.”

“UpRooted” was produced at Tempermill Studios in Ferndale with the assistance of engineer Tony Hamera.

“I know our commitment to do this is there,” Markovitz concluded. “We want to play as many shows as we can. We know it’s the best stuff we’ve done together and will continue with that feeling and write more and keep playing.”

For more information, visit www.escapingpavement.com. - The Daily Tribune


"Detroit Bluegrass: Escaping Pavement at the Americana in Houston"

Unfamiliar performers and a rainy weekend can make for a small crowd, even on a Saturday night in a big city. Such was the case when Michigan-based folk-bluegrass duo Escaping Pavement played Houston listening room The Americana on Feb. 24. But guitarist Emily Burns and guitarist-mandolinist Aaron Markovitz, both veterans of what they described as a thriving Detroit bluegrass scene, were undeterred by the sparse turnout, playing three enthusiastic sets that showcased their strong vocals and instrumental skills.

Burns, on acoustic and electric guitars, and Markovitz, alternating between guitar and mandolin, are fine singers, both separately and together. On many songs, they alternated singing verses and harmonizing on the choruses. They featured several songs from their recent EP, The Night Owl, among them the folkie-sounding “Wanderers,” the more uptempo “Fuel the Fire” and the slow and sweet “Dumb Luck,” featuring some intricate interplay between Burns’ acoustic guitar and Markovitz’s mandolin.

They demonstrated what they called their “Southern Michigan rock” chops on “Burn This Bridge” and showed off their bluegrass abilities on “Boll Weevil,” “Old Daingerfield” and “Angel Band.” Other highlights included “Hetch Hetchy,” a tribute to a Northern California valley that was controversially flooded in 1923 to form a reservoir to supply the San Francisco Bay area, and “What Will We Do Then?,” which they recorded last year as a benefit for Earth Day.

The duo also offered interesting interpretations of songs by a diverse group of fellow singer-songwriters, including The Civil Wars (“From This Valley”), Bruce Springsteen (“Atlantic City”), the Rolling Stones (“Wild Horses”), Bob Dylan (“Girl from the North Country”) and Lady Gaga (“You and I”). They regretfully declined an audience request for Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah,” even though it was accompanied by an offer to pay their bar tab.

Escaping Pavement’s Southwest Tour continues next month with several dates in Texas and New Mexico; their schedule for the rest of the year shows gigs in the upper Midwest and across the country, mostly in smaller venues from Florida to California. This is music worth hearing, from musicians worth watching. - Paul T. Mueller/Americana Music News


Discography

Wilderness Cathedrals: A Tribute to America's National Parks-June 4th, 2017 (4 song EP consisting of songs written about different National Parks)

What Will We Do Then?/So-Called-Uninformed-April 22nd, 2017 (Earth Day Single)

The Night Owl-June 4th, 2016

Uprooted-released July 26th, 2013

Photos

Bio

  • Detroit Music Award Winners for Outstanding Americana Recording 2017 (The Night Owl)
  • 2017 Official Showcase Artist at Folk Alliance Region Midwest Conference
  • 2018 Official Showcase Artist at Southeast Regional Folk Alliance Conference
  • 2018 Official Showcase Artist at Listening Room Network Festival
  • 2017 Honorable Mention for Bryce (from Wilderness Cathedrals EP) in Instrumentals category of Mid-Atlantic Song Contest

From Detroit to Pasadena, to the high seas and then back to Detroit; it’s only when the Detroit-Music-Award-winning, singer/songwriter duo Emily Burns and Aaron Markovitz escaped the neon blitz and car-strewn concrete of the city that they discovered how well their music could bloom when they brought it back to the roots. There is so much life and vitality in the Americana-folk journeys of Escaping Pavement, sprung entirely from an acoustic guitar, a mandolin, and two voices. Fiery passion, wistful reflection, awestruck adventurousness, and heartstring-plucking poignancy, the duo discovers, through song, the range of human emotion and celebrates the purities of what we’ve left behind for the artifices of tech trends, drug stores and cacophonous city centers. 

Their romance together came only after they started singing songs together, having met in 2005, as teenagers, at an open-mic night. From there, they would continue collaborating in several other bands together, but they stepped up their game when they both got accepted to the Los Angeles College of Music. When they graduated, they hopped a cruise ship as part of a band running through covers of Top 40’s hits for waltzing baby-boomers. They came back to Detroit, but discovered that after two years of singing songs together on that cruise ship, for four hours a day, seven days a week, their singing voices had become fused into a perfect harmony. 

Started in 2012, Escaping Pavement released their debut, Uprooted in the summer of 2013, with the stomp of drums and the growl of the guitars giving it more of a blues-rock feel. However, soon after,  Burns and Markovitz felt their inspirations being drawn toward the sounds of folk, country, bluegrass and Americana, and so Escaping Pavement became a duo, with unplugged string instruments, and centered on the surest magic of their musical collaboration, their voices in melodic unison. The grit and swagger of “Burn This Bridge” (from Uprooted) sounds a world away from “Fuel The Fire,” the lead single from 2016’s The Night Owl, where the eureka being shared by its two singers is palpable, that they’ve discovered their natural environment. That the music they make should, itself, sound like a natural environment. 

The talent, the chemistry, the holistic mindset, it shines in every song. Burns and Markovitz have dismissed glitz and glamour, no amp feedback or laser light shows, no bandwagons hopped nor convoluted fusing of disparate subgenres; just the beauty of acoustic music and the warm rejuvenation of two vocal intonations that perfectly complement one another. It's chemistry like this that led to the duo being an official showcase selection at Folk Alliance Region Midwest conference 2017.


The Detroit Music Award winning album, The Night Owl was released in summer of 2016, and songs like “Fuel The Fire,” “Derailed,” and “Mary” crackle and shine with the synchronicity they’ve built up over a dozen years together. With Escaping Pavement, we’re reminded about how vital of an instrument the human voice can be, how much a shared relationship manifests harmonic magic, and how restorative it can be, as a listener, to get back to the basics, the roots, the acoustic timbres and twangs, the elegance of which we may have forgotten while we were distracted by billboards, nightclubs and Instagram feeds… How wonderful it is, to escape the pavement, and get some dirt, and gravel under your shoes again. Have you escaped the pavement, lately? 


Band Members